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The Worst Wrestler Of Every Year Since 2000

Wrestling

Finding success in the world of professional wrestling certainly isn’t the easiest thing to do. Superstars who want to make it to television have to have the right combination of athleticism and personality while having a look that makes them unique from the rest of the roster. One would assume that everyone who makes it to television was able to show all of that in tryouts and in house shows.

However, wrestling fans from all generations can agree that there will always some wrestlers who are surprisingly able to make it to television – whether for WWE, WCW or TNA. It can be baffling how many wrestlers are pushed to main television just because they are seven feet tall or look as if they weigh a metric ton. Or the promoters see someone who looks good with just enough muscle to be an underdog against the giants to impress the fans.

Every year, there are a number of wrestlers on television who either don’t look the part, don’t have the personality to carry a match or the physical abilities to make a match look passable to the eye. Each year there’s a superstar who can easily be listed as the worst on television, or someone who is too overrated to even receive the push they are given.

The following is a look at the worst professional wrestlers through each year since 2000. For wrestling fans who have watched during this time period, most of these wrestlers will likely be expected to appear.

2000 – Kevin Nash

via neogaf.com

via neogaf.com



Kevin Nash was one of the biggest acquisitions in WCW when he formed the New World Order with Scott Hall and Hulk Hogan in 1996. But by 2000, Nash was not booked consistently. The year 2000 saw Nash going into feuds with Scott Steiner and Booker T, which included winning the WCW World Heavyweight Championship. But then the WCW brought him down the card to be in a tag team with Diamond Dallas Page – The Insiders.

While the duo had won the WCW World Tag Team Championship a couple of times, Nash was not wrestling at the same level as he did when he was making the jump to help start the Monday Night War. Things didn’t get better as WCW was beginning the process of being sold to WWE in 2001.

2001 – Big Show

via catchasylum.com

via catchasylum.com



Despite being seven-feet tall and weighing more than 500 pounds, 2001 was not really one of the best years Big Show had. It started out rough when he was eliminated by The Rock during the 2001 Royal Rumble. He would then be in a triple threat match with Kane and Raven for the WWE Hardcore Championship at WrestleMania — a forgettable match that felt very flat. Big Show would spend most of the year supporting WWE during “The Invasion.”

Big Show then lost to Shane McMahon in a Last Man Standing match before having a segment in which he left an interview with tears in his eyes. While it wasn’t the last time we would see a giant cry, it certainly hurt his image for the fans. The one highlight he did have was being part of the winning Team WWE during the 2001 Survivor Series main event, but he was the first one eliminated.

2002 – 3 Minute Warning (Rosey and Jamal)

via pl.wwe.com

via pl.wwe.com



Eric Bischoff was certainly trying to bring different things to WWE RAW during the Ruthless Aggression Era. But he also would give certain people only about three minutes to impress before calling in Rosey and Jamal. It felt perfect that their team was called Three Minute Warning since it felt like they could keep a match interesting for only a few minutes. Neither were able to contribute much to the tag team division and were named the Worst Tag Team by most wrestling publications.

Their highest profile match was a feud with the Dudley Boyz and Jeff Hardy at Survivor Series. But Rosey and Jamal would lose the tables match and remain on the lower-to-mid section of the card before eventually splitting up in 2003. Rosey would become The Hurricane’s “Super Hero In Training” and Jamal would be released and come back transformed as Umaga.

2003 – Nathan Jones

via youthensnews.com

via youthensnews.com



There was a period of time when the WWE seemed intent on signing only large athletes, regardless of what their wrestling experience or talent was before signing. Less than two years since he was training and wrestling with World Wrestling All-Stars, Nathan Jones was signed to a WWE contract. He looked impressive at seven-feet tall and 350 pounds. Jones was also a champion strongman, but the Australian giant lacked in-ring abilities.

Jones was written into a storyline to be mentored by Undertaker and was planned to team with The Deadman against Big Show and A-Train at WrestleMania XIX. However, he was written off with an on-screen attack to keep him out of the match that Undertaker still won. Even after a demotion to Ohio Valley Wrestling, the WWE tried to rush him back in the fall of 2003. Jones still struggled to find success before he decided to quit WWE before the end of the year.

2004 – Mordecai

via wsimg.com

via wsimg.com



The WWE certainly had something in mind back for a new rival to The Undertaker. In 2004, there were vignettes airing for a man named Mordecai. He was a larger superstar who dressed in all-white and had a gimmick that seemed focused on the Christian faith. The goal was to rid the world of evil and do away with the sinners in the WWE. The character was a great idea for someone who would likely face The Deadman.

However, the wrestling skills were not up to par with the very good gimmick. This led to the character eventually being written off television shortly after his undefeated streak was ended by Rey Mysterio. This wouldn’t be the last time we saw the wrestler who portrayed Mordecai in WWE. He made a return to WWE television with a vampire gimmick as Kevin Thorn in ECW.