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Top 15 Worst Draft Mistakes Of The Cleveland Cavaliers

Though the Cavaliers have been lucky to get their good friend LeBron James back in their city, they have made some pretty big draft mistakes in their team history. Most of these draft selections are not necessarily talked about all the time, because in recent years, the team has progressed into a partial success story. Their success will be complete with an NBA Championship.

Getting Kyrie Irving in the 2011 NBA Draft was a step in the right direction for Ohio's only NBA team. Though he just missed the LBJ window, he brought a little life to an obviously awful team. Even with Kyrie, the team did struggle. They made a big move by getting Love and James. Now they are ready to contend for titles, as proven by two straight Finals appearances.

Before all of this, and before LeBron wore a red jersey with stitched lettering saying "Cavaliers," the city had struggled to pick the right prospects. Their success was limited because of poor executive decisions. If the city didn't struggle to select the good prospects, this article would be non-existent. But they did, and this article is factual evidence of their mistakes.

Everyone struggles with decision-making, and if you don't, then that is great. All NBA teams experience the pressure of taking the correct prospect, and sometimes teams cannot live up to these expectations of fans. The Cavaliers have taken players who barely wore jerseys high up in the draft. They have sometimes selected men who were out of the league before the next draft occurred. The team has made serious blunders.

Here Are The Top 15 Worst Draft Mistakes Of The Cleveland Cavaliers. You may have never heard of these players because there is nothing to hear about. They have been unproductive schlubs.

15 John Morton

via bleacherreport.net

14 Stewart Granger

via bleacherreport.com

13 Harry Davis

via nolefan.org

Though Harry Davis was selected 33rd overall in the 1978 NBA Draft, which typically isn't a spot where superstars are taken, he should have been better than he was. In older years, the NBA draft was much longer. Therefore, 2nd and third round picks were valuable. Well, Davis wasn't very valuable.

12 Chuckie Williams

via kansas.com

11 John Lambert

via nba.com

10 Dwight Davis

via legendsofbasketball.com

For some reason, of which I am unsure, Dwight Davis somehow played three seasons with the team. He was taken third overall in the 1972 NBA Draft, and was extremely sub par. He was never a real threat on the court, and scored and rebounded in low numbers. Though his career wasn't horrendous, he was a very high selection, and his stats do not solidify that he should have been picked so high. Davis finished his career in 1978 with the Warriors.

9 Steve Patterson

via sportsencyclopedia.com

8 Andre Miller

via bleacherreport.com

7 Shannon Brown

via bleacherreport.com

6 DeSagana Diop

via rantsports.com

I really feel bad for fans who had to watch him in their favorite team's uniform. Diop was the 8th overall pick in 2001. The Cavs could have set themselves up for the future by taking Joe Johnson, Zach Randolph or Tony Parker. Then again, maybe picking one of those guys would have improved them too much to win the 2003 draft lottery.

5 Dajuan Wagner

via foxsports.com

4 Vitaly Potapenko

via stepienrules.com

3 Luke Jackson

via kingjamesgospel.com

The 10th overall pick in the 2004 NBA Draft was Luke Jackson. He was selected ahead of some serious talent as well. His college career was misleading, and his professional career was a blur. He was a free agent very early on, and struggled with knee injuries. He moved from team to team, never establishing a connection with any organization. After hitting the jackpot with LeBron this was a poor way to follow it up.

2 Trajan Langdon

via cleveland.com

1 Anthony Bennett

via thesportspost.com

Bennett is easily one of the biggest busts in NBA history. As the first overall pick from UNLV, he has never amounted to anything. His 2013 arrival into the NBA was meaningless for Ohio. His mediocre playing style made him a bench player. His first season in the NBA was a dud, and he averaged 4.2 PPG. The FIRST pick in the draft averaged 4.4 points per game. His second season was just as bad, and he averaged 5.2 PPG. He floated to Minnesota, then to Toronto, and is now in the D-League. The Cavaliers should have looked into this man before taking him first overall. His career has been an utter joke.

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Top 15 Worst Draft Mistakes Of The Cleveland Cavaliers