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8 NFL Players Most Likely To Fail After Retirement (And 7 Who Will Succeed!)

It doesn’t seem like NFL players really need a degree in anything for some of them to succeed after they retire. A huge perk of being in the NFL is that you gain a following and a lot of experience with football. Because of that, many of these players instantly find other ways to make money after their career is over. This happens in all types of sports, as we have seen Michael Jordan become the CEO of a basketball team and Tony Romo become one of the lead sports broadcasters on CBS. It just seems too easy and natural for these players to find jobs after retirement. It’s almost as if they don’t even have to try.

While some of these players find jobs rather quickly, a lot of players struggle to find anything. In fact, many of them actually get arrested or go broke after their career is over. On the other hand, some of these players just don’t really find anything to do after retirement. For this article, being a failure after retirement will mean players that we think will not do anything after their career. This could be a legitimate life failure, as well as just simply not finding another job. Remember, these players make so much money throughout that their career that a lot of them can live off of the money they made during their playing days for the rest of their lives.

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15 Fail: Ndamukong Suh - Detroit Lions

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Despite the fact that Ndamukong Suh hasn’t played as well in Miami as he did in Detroit, he also doesn’t have the personality to really do anything after football. Suh has been known for abusing other players on the field and being quite vicious. Due to that, he hasn’t really received a lot of attention from companies wanting to sign him to endorse them. With his actions and decline in popularity, Suh probably has next to no shot at ever having a chance at getting an endorsement deal after his career ends.

Suh doesn't really seem like the kind of guy to go into coaching, as he uses his physical assets to help him. And he definitely doesn’t seem like the type to have the personality to watch on television. Suh seems like one of those players that will become irrelevant after his career is over.

14 Succeed: Dak Prescott - Dallas Cowboys

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I think everyone can agree that Dak Prescott looks like one of the better role models in the NFL. Prescott has one of the greatest stories of all and it’s far from complete. He's a fourth-round draft pick from Mississippi State, whose mother passed away during his college years, that took the Cowboys to the playoffs in his rookie season. Prescott dominated the entire year, took Tony Romo's job and earned the NFC Rookie of the Year Award.

Even though we still have years and years to go, it seems that Prescott will have a successful career, which will lead him to a successful career after his time on the field is over. Unlike with this situation, Prescott will not follow Romo into the broadcasting booth. Prescott seems like the perfect fit to be coaching after his time is done. He seems like he’s really good at reading coverages and could other young quarterbacks read defenses in the future.

13 Fail: Adrian Peterson - Arizona Cardinals

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Adrian Peterson may be one of the greatest running backs we have ever seen, but unfortunately his life after football may not be as great. Peterson’s legacy has been up in the air after it was claimed that he hit his child. Now, although the issue has nothing to do with football, it will affect his chances of getting a job after he retires. Expect Peterson to become irrelevant after his career will end. Not many owners of companies or franchises are going to want to sign a man who has been known for hitting his son. And to be honest, not a lot of people are going to want to take orders from a person like that. Peterson won’t become a bum, but he also won’t stay in the spotlight after the football is taken away from him.

12 Succeed: Philip Rivers - Los Angeles Chargers

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When it comes to personality on the field, Philip Rivers is one of the most entertaining guys in the league. Rivers gets extremely excited and definitely isn’t afraid to let the referees know how he feels about some of the calls, or let his teammates know about how he feels with some of their play.

Rivers personality is perfect to be a reporter for something like NFL Sunday Countdown. Unlike some of the current broadcasters, Rivers has the personality to make it really interesting to watch him actually voice his opinions. I could see him having great skits and him getting fired up during pregame shows, talking about the winners and losers of the day. Expect to see Rivers on your pregame show on Sundays after he retires.

11 Fail: Ben Roethlisberger - Pittsburgh Steelers

Philip G. Pavely-USA TODAY Sports

With many companies, organizations and franchises, it’s important to keep drama within that group. Throughout his career, ben Roethlisberger has not been able to do that. He has exposed the drama between him and some of his teammates, including Martavis Bryant and Antonio Brown on television. Fans get that there’s always going to be frustration between teammates, but there’s not always a need to air the dirty laundry to the public. For instance, Roethlisberger told the media that he was “let down” by Bryant’s actions during a press conference.

The fact that Roethlisberger has no problem letting the media know his feelings may not help him ever coach. No team is going to want a coach that allows this much drama and talks about it publicly. If Roethlisberger had a better personality and was able to keep some information behind closed doors, than it would likely be a different story.

10 Succeed: Russell Wilson - Seattle Seahawks

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If a player could dream to be any NFL player right now, Russell Wilson should be that player to dream about. Yes, Tom Brady and Aaron Rodgers are two of the best quarterbacks that have ever played the game, but Wilson is a winner on and off the field, and has a great personality. Wilson seems to what Dak Prescott is becoming. Not the most physical guy, but a true winner with a great mentality.

There are so many options for Wilson after he retires. Wilson could always go into coaching as he’s a heck of a leader. He always seems to have command of this team regardless the amount of the egos there are or the position they’re in. Wilson could also do well in the booth, as he has a charming personality and natural flow of talking.

9 Fail: Adam Jones - Cincinnati Bengals

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This is probably one of the most obvious ones of them all. Adam Jones has been a problem in the NFL ever since he was drafted and not in a good way. If Jones wasn’t such a good player, chances are his career would have ended back in 2007 when he was suspended for a full season. Jones has dealt with many suspensions, fines and arrests. It seems that even an older version of Pacman Jones, cannot stay out of trouble.

Jones is not afraid to get into it with anybody, including police officers. This is one of those players that might not just become irrelevant after football ends, but he could see himself getting into some trouble with football to keep him focused.

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8 Succeed: Brandon Marshall - New York Giants

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Brandon Marshall has pretty much already found a life after retirement, just he continues to play. A lot of times Marshall is working in the booths when he’s not playing during the offseason. Since 2014, Marshall has played a role on Showtime’s Inside The NFL. It just seems so natural for him to engage and talk with other broadcasters on television, even when his main focus is on playing football.

It seems that right after Marshall retires, he will find himself in the booth immediately. Where exactly his career will go remain unknown, but mark my words Brandon Marshall will become a sports broadcaster after his career in the NFL is done with.

7 Fail: Le'Veon Bell - Pittsburgh Steelers

Charles LeClaire-USA TODAY Sports

Who would ever think that a team with the best trio in the NFL would be filled with troubled players? Well, here’s the second player on this list from the Pittsburgh Steelers, but this time, it’s a running back. Le’Veon Bell has been amazing on the field, but he's also been a headache for this Steelers team, and he probably doesn’t even care that he has done so. Bell has been suspended multiple times for drug related issues. There have been claims that, even after his suspensions, Bell still continues to use illegal substances.

Bell just doesn’t have the personality to have a career within football after he retires and likely won't want to continue to adhere to NFL rules when he's done. He may be a great ball player, but that doesn’t mean he'll have a great retirement in the NFL.

6 Succeed: Dez Bryant - Dallas Cowboys

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This choice may shock many viewers, but there’s a reason behind this one. Michael Irvin was also a troubled wide receiver of the Dallas Cowboys back in the 90s, then he matured and became one of the best football analysts in the country. Dez Bryant seems to be following the same steps that Irvin took. Bryant was accused of hitting his mother in an incident, which led to him being known as a wide receiver who couldn’t stay out of trouble. As this Cowboys team got younger, Bryant seemed to mature more and now looks like a leader on the team.

His ability to learn from his mistakes and become a better person gives me all the confidence in the world that he will succeed after his career is over. Bryant likes to talk a lot, as that’s part of his character, so there’s a great chance that we'll see Dez sitting next to Irvin in the studio in the future.

5 Fail: Jay Cutler - Miami Dolphins

Jasen Vinlove-USA TODAY Sports

How can a NFL player who retired and found a job for after his career being considered a failure? Well, Jay Cutler has proven to the world that he cannot succeed after retirement. It seems that Cutler took a job as a sports broadcaster after he couldn’t find another job anywhere else in the league. Once the Dolphins had an opening after Ryan Tannehill went down, Cutler came straight out of retirement to play for the Dolphins. When he started playing for the Dolphins, he admitted that he didn’t think he was in shape to play football and that he didn't need to be because he is a quarterback.

His personality reflects that he doesn’t really care enough to do anything, as he will take whatever he can to continue making money and staying relevant. His poor performance in Miami proves that he should never be the one to coach another player. And he doesn’t really have the personality to sit behind a camera and talk. It's entirely possible that Fox won’t take back Cutler whenever he decides to retire again.

4 Succeed: Aaron Rodgers - Green Bay Packers

Matthew Emmons-USA TODAY Sports
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Aaron Rodgers really will decide his own destiny after his career ends. Tom Brady also could fill in this slot, but there’s a good chance that after Brady retires he'll just decide to leave football. Rodgers seems more likely to stay as it’s been his whole life.

Rodgers could look into coaching, as he could really probably coach anything from an offensive unit up to a head coaching job. He would also be great in the booth like Tony Romo has been, as he could probably explain what is going to happen before it happens in a similar way. Seeing Romo and Rodgers in the booth together would probably be an incredible experience.

3 Fail: Odell Beckham Jr. - New York Giants

Jonathan Dyer-USA TODAY Sports

As OBJ is very exciting to watch on television, at this point, he’s way too immature to be seen as a sports broadcaster. We get that some player's feelings get the best of them, but it just seems to happen to OBJ way too often. We see him crying too much or throwing his stuff around, that fans are just confused as to why he always acts like a baby. Having him on television would see him just whining about every little thing that goes wrong.

The only thing OBJ could possibly successful with after he retires is fashion, as he does know how to dress. However, as far as getting another job that may deal with sports, we don't see it happening for the one-handed catch legend.

2 Succeed: Rob Gronkowski - New England Patriots

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He may not be Mr. Invincible, but he has a personality of gold. Rob Gronkowski is bad when it comes to staying healthy, but he’s one of the best tight ends to ever play and he has one interesting personality. Gronkowski can really do many things with himself after his NFL career. He could do some of the basics, including becoming a sports broadcaster or coach. However, I see Gronkowski doing something different, something a lot more fun.

Gronkowski seems like he will take the same path that Shaquille O’Neal did after his career. Gronkowski loves to party and his life after the NFL may be one big party. You may see Gronkowski possibly open up nightclubs or bars to continue his party habits. You may even see, like Shaq, Gronkowski become a DJ and continue to party after his career is over. Gronkowski may be one of those football players that you see partying until he’s very old.

1 Fail: Marshawn Lynch - Oakland Raiders

Cary Edmondson-USA TODAY Sports

Marshawn Lynch can barely speak to the media, so we don't think he'll want to speak to millions of viewers day after day. Lynch tends to do whatever he wants and those around him kind of just flow with it. However, after his career is completely over, we don't see him being as wanted as before. Because of that, no one is going to need him to coach or broadcast, or even get involved with endorsements.

Lynch will eventually move on with football and the rest of his life, and completely avoid the spotlight. As much as fans love him, there’s no shot of him hanging on to football once he retires.

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