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Ranking Every Captain In Montreal Canadiens History

Having been around for over a hundred years, the Montreal Canadiens are the oldest and longest running hockey franchise. From 1909 until 1917, they were part of the National Hockey Association. They t

Having been around for over a hundred years, the Montreal Canadiens are the oldest and longest running hockey franchise. From 1909 until 1917, they were part of the National Hockey Association. They then became part of the National Hockey League in 1917 and have been the most successful team in the history of the sport. No other teams have won as many Stanley Cups as the Canadiens. They’ve won a total of 24 Stanley Cups – the first one in 1916 and their last one in 1993.

In their 108 years of existence, the Habs have had a total of 29 team captains, beginning with Jack Laviolette in 1909 to their current captain, Max Pacioretty. Jean Beliveau captained the team for ten seasons and won a total of five Stanley Cups as their leader – the most of any captain in franchise history. In fact, of the 24 Stanley Cups the Canadiens have won, there were eleven different captains who have led the team during those seasons.

They did, however, spend two seasons without a captain. The first time was in 2009-10 after Saku Koivu served as their captain from 1999-2009. The second time was in 2014-15 after Brian Gionta spent four years as their captain from 2010-2014.

Let’s take a look at all 29 captains in the history of the Montreal Canadiens.

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29 Mike Keane

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Mike Keane spent eight seasons with the Canadiens from 1988 to 1996. The 6 foot tall, 185 pound right winger wasn’t overly impressive on the score sheet with just 269 points in 506 regular season games. In 77 playoff games, he recorded 34 points.

When then-captain Kirk Muller was traded in April 1995, Mike Keane became Montreal’s new captain for the remainder of the 1994-95 season. He then began the 1995-96 season as their captain until getting traded that December to the Colorado Avalanche. At that point, Pierre Turgeon took over the duties as team captain.

Keane helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1993. Interestingly enough, he won a total of three Stanley Cups in his NHL career with three different teams – 1993 with Montreal, 1996 with Colorado, and 1999 with Dallas.

28 Walter Buswell

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Walter Buswell played five seasons with the Canadiens from 1935-1940 and captained the team in his final season with them (1939-40). The 5’11, 170 pound defenseman recorded 37 points in 228 regular season games. He also appeared in 11 playoff games and tallied 2 goals.

Buswell’s year as captain wasn’t a very successful one. Although they started off really well with four wins and two ties in their first six games, their hot streak didn’t last. They even had a nine-game losing streak from December 16th until January 6th. As a matter of fact, the Canadiens only won three games from December 16, 1939 to March 17, 1940. Needless to say, the Habs finished in last place that season and failed to make the playoffs.

Although his time as captain wasn’t a very good one, Buswell was a decent and reliable defenseman with the Canadiens.

27 Billy Coutu

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Billy Coutu spent nine seasons with the Montreal Canadiens between 1916-17 and 1925-26. He also served as captain of the team during his last season with them.

This 5’11, 190 pound defenseman definitely wasn’t afraid to defend his territory. During his time with the Habs, he accumulated a total of 357 penalty minutes in 198 regular season games. He led the team with 67 penalty minutes in the 1919-20 season.

He wasn’t a big point producing defenseman, having recorded just 40 points in his 198 regular season games. He also appeared in 17 playoff games, earning just one assist and racking up 81 penalty minutes. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1924.

Coutu was never inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, but he will always be remembered to Canadiens fans as being one of the most feared defensemen of his time.

26 Chris Chelios

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Chris Chelios played seven seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1983 to 1990. The 6’1, 191 pound defenseman was also a great point producer, racking up 309 points in 402 regular season games with the Habs. He also appeared in 98 playoff games with them, earning 68 points.

He led all Canadiens defensemen in points during three seasons: 64 points in 1984-85, 61 points in 1987-88, and 73 points in 1988-89.

During the 1989-90 season, Chris Chelios and Guy Carbonneau became the first co-captains in franchise history. Chelios helped the Habs win the Stanley Cup in 1986. He was then awarded the James Norris Memorial Trophy in 1989 as the best defenseman in the league.

Chelios was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2013.

25 Jimmy Gardner

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Jimmy Gardner only played two seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1913 to 1915, but during that time he served as both their head coach and team captain. During those two seasons, the 5’9, 180 pound left winger played a total of 17 regular season games with the Habs and averaged over a point a game with 19 points.

In Gardner’s first season as the Canadiens’ coach and captain, they had a great season, finishing tied for first place overall with the Toronto Blueshirts. They ended up having to play each other determine who would win the O’Brien Cup which was given to the champions of the National Hockey Association. In the two-game playoff series, the Blueshirts defeated the Canadiens by outscoring them 6 goals to 2.

In Gardner’s second and final season with Montreal, they finished the regular season in last place, failing to appear in the playoffs. That was the last time we saw him in a Habs jersey.

Jimmy Gardner was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.

24 Kirk Muller

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Kirk Muller only played four seasons with the Canadiens from 1991 to 1995. He did, however, serve less than one season as their captain. He began the 1994-95 season as their captain until he was traded in April of 1995. Mike Keane then took over as captain.

At 6 feet tall and 205 pounds, Muller was a left winger who put up very impressive numbers with 247 points in 267 regular season games. During the 1991-92 regular season, he led the team in goals (36) and points (77). He also played in a total of 38 playoff games and recorded 32 points.

His most successful season with the Canadiens was in 1992-93 when he averaged over a point a game with 94 points in 80 regular season games. Also that season, he helped his team win their 24th and final Stanley Cup in 1993.

Muller is currently working as an associate coach for the Canadiens.

23 George Hainsworth

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In the 1932-33 season, George Hainsworth became the first goaltender in franchise history to serve as team captain.

The 5’6, 150 pound goalie played a total of 318 regular season games with the Canadiens between 1926 and 1937, earning 167 wins, 97 losses, and 54 ties. His incredible 1.78 goals against average remains a team record to this day, along with his amazing 75 shutouts.

He also appeared in 31 playoff games and earned a fantastic 1.70 goals against average, helping the Canadiens win two Stanley Cups in 1930 and 1931. He also became the first ever recipient of the Vezina Trophy when he awarded the coveted trophy three consecutive seasons in 1927, 1928 and 1929. Up until the 1982 season, the Vezina Trophy was given to the goaltender(s) who played at least 25 regular season games for the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them.

Hainsworth was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1961.

22 Vincent Damphousse

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Vincent Damphousse spent seven seasons with the Canadiens from 1992 to 1999. The 6’1, 205 pound center racked up an impressive 498 points in 519 regular season games. He led the team in points during three seasons – 1992-93, 1993-94 and 1996-97.

He also appeared in 48 playoff games and earned 43 points. He helped the Habs win the Stanley Cup in 1993.

After then-captain Pierre Turgeon was traded in October 1996, Vincent Damphousse took over as Montreal’s new captain. He continued to wear the “C” until March 1999 when he was traded to the San Jose Sharks in exchange for several draft picks.

During the first two seasons that Damphousse captained the Canadiens, they made the playoffs both years, but were eliminated in the quarter-finals and semi-finals respectively. In 1998-99 when Damphousse was traded, the Habs finished last overall in their Division and failed to make the playoffs.

21 Brian Gionta

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Brian Gionta spent five seasons with the Canadiens from 2009 to 2014. The 5’7, 173 pound right winger recorded just 173 points in 303 regular season games.

After playing the 2009-10 season without a captain, the Canadiens gave the leadership role to Gionta prior to the 2010-11 season. He remained their captain for four years until the end of the 2013-14 season, when he decided to sign with the Buffalo Sabres during the off-season.

During his four seasons as captain, the Habs made the playoffs three times. Two of those seasons they didn’t get past the quarter-finals, but during his last season as captain, they made it to the conference finals, where they lost in six games to the New York Rangers. In 45 playoff games, Gionta tallied 28 points.

He is still currently playing in the NHL as captain of the Buffalo Sabres.

20 Max Pacioretty

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Max Pacioretty began his career with the Canadiens during the 2008-09 season and has been with them ever since. So far, the 6’2, 215 pound left winger has played 529 regular season games and has 383 points. He has also played in 32 playoff games and recorded 18 points.

In his first eight seasons with the Habs, he hit the 30-goal plateau four times and is well on his way there again this season with 21 goals in 48 games so far. In fact, he has led the team in points for the last five consecutive seasons and is currently leading his teammates this season with 39 points.

He was awarded the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in 2012 for being the player who best showed qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to the sport.

After spending the 2014-15 season without a captain, the Montreal Canadiens named Pacioretty their new leader in 2015 and he is still currently wearing the “C”.

19 Pierre Turgeon

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Pierre Turgeon played a total of 104 regular season games with the Montreal Canadiens between the 1994-95 and 1996-97 seasons, averaging over a point a game with 127 points. The 6’1, 199 pound center also recorded 6 points in 6 playoff games.

After then-captain Mike Keane got traded in December 1995, Pierre Turgeon took over the reigns as their new captain. He finished the 1995-96 season leading the team in assists (58), points (96), and tied for first with 38 goals in 80 games.

He began the 1996-97 season as their captain, but after playing just nine games, he was traded on October 29th, along with Rory Fitzpatrick and Craig Conroy, to the St. Louis Blues in exchange for Shayne Corson, Murray Baron and a fifth round pick in 1997. Vincent Damphousse took over as Montreal’s new captain after Turgeon left.

18 Bill Durnan

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Bill Durnan spent seven seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1943-1950. The 6 foot tall, 190 pound goaltender played a total of 383 regular season games with them and recorded 208 wins (including 34 shutouts), 112 losses and 62 ties.

He also appeared in 45 playoff games, earning 27 wins (including two shutouts) and 18 losses. He helped the Canadiens win two Stanley Cups in 1944 and 1946.

Also during his time with the Canadiens, he was awarded six Vezina Trophies – 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949 and 1950. At that time, he won the trophy for being the goaltender who played at least 25 games for the team who had the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season.

After Toe Blake got injured during the 1947-48 season, Bill Durnan replaced him as the team captain for the final few months of the regular season. He was actually the last goaltender to ever serve as captain, since the NHL changed the rule later that year so that goalies couldn’t wear the “C”.

Durnan was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1964.

17 Jack Laviolette

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Jack Laviolette was the first ever captain in Montreal Canadiens history. He served as their team captain in two separate seasons – 1909-10 and again in 1911-12. Also during the 1909-10 season, he served as their first ever head coach and also the general manager.

The 5’11, 170 pound defenseman played a total of 155 regular season games with the Canadiens from 1909-1918 and earned 67 points. He also appeared in 14 playoff games and totalled 3 points. He helped the Canadiens win their first ever Stanley Cup in 1915-16, but at the time he was not their captain.

He retired after the 1917-18 season, which coincidentally was the first year the team played in the newly formed National Hockey League. Laviolette will always be remembered as the first ever captain, coach and general manager of what turned out to be the most successful team in the history of the sport. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1962.

16 Howard McNamara

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Howard McNamara served as Montreal’s team captain for the 1915-16 season. He played two different seasons with them, the first one being in 1915-16, then again in 1919-20.

This large 6 foot tall, 240 pound defenseman wasn’t afraid to throw his weight around, tallying a total of 123 penalty minutes, along with 18 points in 34 regular season games with them. He also appeared in 5 playoff games with them in 1915-16 and helped his team to their first ever Stanley Cup victory by defeating the Portland Rosebuds in a five-game series.

Although McNamara only played two seasons with the Habs and was never inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame, he will always be remembered as the man who captained the Montreal Canadiens to their first Stanley Cup championship.

15 Doug Harvey

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Doug Harvey played fourteen seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1947-1961. He captained the team in his final season with them in 1960-61.

The 5’11, 190 pound defenseman put up pretty decent numbers, tallying 447 points in 890 regular season games. He also appeared in 123 playoff games and recorded 67 points.

During his time with the Habs, he helped them win six Stanley Cups – 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 and 1960. He was awarded six James Norris Memorial Trophies in 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1960 and 1961 for being the best defenseman in the league. He was also given that same award in 1962 as a member of the New York Rangers.

Harvey was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1973. His number 2 jersey was then retired by the Montreal Canadiens on October 26, 1985.

14 Albert Siebert

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Albert “Babe” Siebert played three seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1936-1939 and also captained the team during that time. Measuring at 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighing in at 182 pounds, he played both forward and defensive positions.

In his three seasons with the Habs, he recorded 63 points in 125 regular season games. The Canadiens made the playoffs in each of those three seasons, but failed to win any Stanley Cups during that time. Siebert did, however, earn the Hart Trophy in 1937 which is awarded annually to the most valuable player in the league. In 11 playoff games, he tallied 5 points.

After he retired, he was named Montreal’s new head coach in 1939, but passed away in a drowning accident before coaching any games. He is the only coach in NHL history to have never won or lost any games.

Siebert was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1964.

13 Edouard “Newsy” Lalonde

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Edouard “Newsy” Lalonde served as the Canadiens’ team captain in three different stints. He first served as their captain during the 1910-11 season, then again in 1912-13. His third stint as their captain was a longer one, serving from 1916-1922.

The 5’9, 168 pound center played a total of 200 regular season games with the Canadiens from 1909-1922, and averaged well over a point a game with a very impressive 328 points. He also averaged over a point a game with 25 points in 18 playoff games and helped them win the Stanley Cup in 1915-16.

In a game during the 1919-20 season, he scored an incredible six goals, which is a team record that stands to this very day.

He also spent 251 regular season games behind the bench of the Canadiens as their head coach in two separate stints between 1915 and 1934, earning 122 wins, 114 losses and 15 ties.

Lalonde was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1950.

12 Guy Carbonneau

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Guy Carbonneau played a total of 912 regular season games with the Canadiens between the 1980-81 and 1993-94 seasons, totalling 547 points. The 5’11, 186 pound center also appeared in 161 playoff games with them and recorded 73 points.

During the 1989-90 season, Guy Carbonneau and Chris Chelios became the first co-captains in franchise history. Carbonneau then served alone as their captain from 1990-1994. He helped his team win two Stanley Cups, the first one in 1986, then in 1993 which is their last Cup win to date. He was also awarded three Frank J. Selke Trophies in 1988, 1989 and 1992 as the best defensive forward during the regular season.

He went on to serve a few seasons as Montreal’s head coach from 2006-2009 and recorded 124 wins, 83 losses and 23 overtime/shootout losses in 230 regular season games. He also has 5 wins and 7 losses in 12 playoff appearances as their coach.

11 Serge Savard

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Serge Savard spent fifteen seasons with the Canadiens from 1966-1981. This 6’2, 210 pound defenseman was known for his “spin-o-rama” moves which resulted with him getting 412 points in 917 regular season games. He also played in 123 playoff games and recorded 68 points.

He served as team captain for two seasons (1979-1981). During his time with the Habs, he helped them win eight Stanley Cups (1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979). He was awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1969 for being the most valuable player during the playoffs. He was then given the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in 1979 for being the player who best showed qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to the sport.

He went on to serve several years as Montreal’s general manager.

Savard was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1986. The Canadiens then retired his number 18 jersey on November 18, 2006.

10 Sprague Cleghorn

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Sprague Cleghorn spent four seasons with the Canadiens from 1921-1925 and served as their team captain during his last three seasons with them.

The 5’10, 190 pound defenseman totalled 248 penalty minutes, along with 73 points, in 98 regular season games. In fact, he led the team in points (26) and penalty minutes (80) for the 1921-22 season.

The Canadiens made the playoffs in all three seasons that Cleghorn captained. He appeared in a total of 5 playoff games and recorded 3 points. He also captained the team to their second ever Stanley Cup in 1924.

Cleghorn will be remembered as a rugged defenseman who wasn’t afraid to throw his body around and who captained the Canadiens to their second Stanley Cup win. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1958.

9 Bob Gainey

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Bob Gainey spent sixteen seasons with the Canadiens from 1973-1989. He also served as their team captain for the last eight seasons of his career from 1981-1989.

The 6’2, 200 pound left winger was known as a great defensive forward. He tallied 501 points and a fantastic +196 rating in 1,160 regular season games. He also appeared in 182 playoff games and produced 73 points. He helped the Canadiens win five Stanley Cups (1976, 1977, 1978, 1979 and 1986) with the last one being won while he captained the team.

He became the first ever recipient of the Frank J. Selke Trophy in 1978 for being the best defensive forward during the regular season. In fact, he won the trophy four consecutive years from 1978 to 1981. He was also awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1979 as the most valuable player in the playoffs.

He went on to serve time as the head coach and general manager of the Montreal Canadiens.

Gainey was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1992. Then on February 23, 2008, his number 23 jersey was retired by the Canadiens.

8 Saku Koivu

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Saku Koivu played thirteen seasons with the Canadiens from 1995 to 2009. He served as team captain from 1999 to 2009.

The 5’10, 187 pound center earned 641 points in 792 regular season games. During his time with the Habs, he led the team in points during three seasons: 47 points in 2000-01 (tied with Oleg Petrov), 71 points in 2002-03, and 75 points in 2006-07.

During his nine years as captain, the Canadiens made the playoffs five times. Koivu played in 54 playoff games and recorded 48 points.

While playing for the Habs, he was awarded the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in 2002 for being the player who best showed qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to the sport. Then in 2007, he was given the King Clancy Memorial Trophy for being the player who best showed qualities of leadership on and off the ice, as well as making a noteworthy humanitarian contribution to the community.

7 Sylvio Mantha

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Sylvio Mantha spent thirteen seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1923 to 1936. The 5’10, 180 pound defenseman played a physical game, racking up 669 penalty minutes in 538 regular season games. In fact, he led the team in penalty minutes for two seasons: 108 penalty minutes in 1929-30 and 62 penalty minutes in 1931-32.

As a stay-at-home defenseman, he wasn’t a big point producer, only recording 141 points in 538 games. He also appeared in 39 playoff games and tallied 10 points, along with 64 penalty minutes.

He served as their team captain from 1926 to 1932 and again from 1933 to 1936. He helped the Canadiens win three Stanley Cups in 1924, 1930 and 1931. Two of those Stanley Cups were won while Mantha was captain (1930 and 1931). The Canadiens made the playoffs in each of the first eight seasons he served as captain. They didn’t, however, make the playoffs in the final season of his captaincy (1935-36) which coincidentally, he also served as their head coach.

Mantha was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1960.

6 Hector “Toe” Blake

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Hector “Toe” Blake spent thirteen seasons with the Canadiens from 1935-1948. The 5’10, 165 pound left winger put up very impressive numbers with 527 points in 569 regular season games. He also appeared in 57 playoff games and racked up 62 points.

He served as Montreal’s captain from 1940 to 1948. The Habs made the playoffs in seven of those eight seasons and he captained them to two Stanley Cup wins in 1944 and 1946. He was also awarded the Lady Byng Memorial Trophy in 1946 which is given annually to the player who shows the best type of sportsmanship and gentlemanly conduct along with having an exceptional playing ability. He was previously awarded the Hart Trophy in 1939 which is given annually to the most valuable player during the regular season.

After Blake suffered a broken leg in January 1948, which ultimately ended his playing career, Bill Durnan took over as captain for the remainder of the season.

That wasn’t the end of Toe Blake’s time with the Canadiens, as he served thirteen seasons as their head coach from 1955-1968 and led them to eight Stanley Cup championships – 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966 and 1968.

Blake was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966.

5 Emile “Butch” Bouchard

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Emile “Butch” Bouchard spent fifteen seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1941-1956. The 6’2, 205 pound hard-hitting defenseman sure made his presence known around the league. In 785 regular season games, he racked up 863 penalty minutes and earned 193 points. He also appeared in 113 playoff games, recording 32 points in 121 penalty minutes.

He served as their team captain from 1948-1956. He helped his team win four Stanley Cups (1944, 1946, 1953 and 1956) with the last two being won while he captained the team. As a matter of fact, the Habs made the playoffs in each of his eight seasons as captain.

Butch Bouchard was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966. Then on December 4, 2009, during the Canadiens’ 100 year anniversary celebration, they retired his number 3 jersey.

4 Henri Richard

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Henri “Pocket Rocket” Richard spent twenty seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1955 to 1975. The 5’7, 160 pound center also served as team captain from 1971-1975.

During his time with the Habs, he produced a very impressive 1,046 points in 1,256 regular season games. As a matter of fact, he holds the franchise record for the highest number of regular season games played. He also appeared in 180 playoff games and recorded 129 points.

He helped his team win an incredible eleven Stanley Cups (1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971 and 1973). Their 1973 Stanley Cup win was while Richard was captain. He was then awarded the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy in 1974 for being the player who best showed qualities of perseverance, sportsmanship and dedication to the sport.

Henri Richard’s number 16 jersey was retired by the Montreal Canadiens on December 10, 1975. He was then inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1979.

3 Yvan Cournoyer

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Yvan Cournoyer spent sixteen seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1963-1979. This speedy right winger had a wicked wrist shot which was proven by his impressive 863 points in 968 regular season games. He also earned 127 points in 147 playoff games.

He served as captain during his last four seasons (1975-76 to 1978-79) and incredibly they won the Stanley Cup in each of those four years. In fact, during his entire career with the Habs, he helped them win a total of ten Stanley Cups (1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979). He was also awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1973 for being the most valuable player during the playoffs.

Cournoyer was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1982. Then on November 12, 2005, his number 12 jersey was retired by the Canadiens.

2 Maurice “Rocket” Richard

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Maurice “Rocket” Richard spent eighteen seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1942-1960. The 5’10, 170 pound right winger is one of the most recognized names in the history of the NHL.

In 978 regular season games, he racked up 965 points and 1,285 penalty minutes. Of all the players in franchise history, Richard is ranked first overall with 544 regular season goals. He also appeared in 133 playoff games and earned 126 points.

He served four seasons as their team captain (1956-1960) and they won the Stanley Cup in each of those four years. In fact, during his entire eighteen seasons with the Habs, he helped them win a total of eight Stanley Cups (1944, 1946, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 and 1960). He was also awarded the Hart Trophy in 1947 as the league’s most valuable player for the regular season.

Since 1999, the NHL awards each year the Maurice Richard Trophy to the player who scored the most goals during the regular season.

After his retirement in 1960, the Canadiens raised his number 9 jersey to the rafters. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1961.

1 Jean Beliveau

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Jean Beliveau played a total of twenty seasons with the Montreal Canadiens which began during the 1950-51 season and ended after the 1970-71 season. The 6’3, 205 pound center is one of the most respected and well known men to have ever played in the NHL.

He put up fantastic numbers during his career, racking up 1,219 points in 1,125 regular season games. He also earned 176 points in 162 playoff appearances. In fact, his 176 playoff points ranks him first overall in franchise history.

Beliveau spent ten seasons as Montreal’s team captain from 1961-1971. During his time with the Canadiens, he helped them win a very impressive ten Stanley Cups (1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969 and 1971); with the last five of them being won while he was their captain.

He was awarded several trophies during his career. He was given two Hart Trophies in 1956 and 1964 as the league’s most valuable player during the regular season. He was awarded the Art Ross Trophy in 1956 for recording the most regular season points among all NHL players. He was also the first ever recipient of the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1965 as the most valuable player during the playoffs.

Beliveau’s number 4 jersey was retired by the Montreal Canadiens on October 9, 1971. He was then inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1972.

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Ranking Every Captain In Montreal Canadiens History