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Ranking Every Starting Goaltender In Montreal Canadiens History From Worst To Best

Since 1909 to the present day, the Montreal Canadiens have had a total of 82 goaltenders who have played at least one game with them.

Since 1909 to the present day, the Montreal Canadiens have had a total of 82 goaltenders who have played at least one game with them. From Joseph Cattarinich and Teddy Groulx, who were their first ever franchise goaltenders during the 1909-10 season, to Carey Price and Al Montoya, who are their current goalies, the Habs have had a tremendous amount of talent guarding their net over the years.

Two goaltenders have even served as captain of the Canadiens. In the 1932-33 season, George Hainsworth became the first goaltender in franchise history to serve as team captain. Then in 1948, after Toe Blake got injured, Bill Durnan replaced him as the team captain for the final few months of the regular season. He was the last goaltender to ever lead his team, since the NHL changed the rule later that year so that goalies couldn’t wear the “C”.

The most coveted award among NHL goaltenders is the Vezina Trophy. Each year, it is awarded to the best goaltender in the league. However, prior to 1982, it was given to the goaltender(s) of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. A total of 13 Canadiens goalies have been honored with the award throughout the years:

George Hainsworth: 1927, 1928, 1929

Bill Durnan: 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949, 1950

Jacques Plante: 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1962

Charlie Hodge: 1964, 1966

Lorne Worsley: 1966, 1968

Rogatien Vachon: 1968

Ken Dryden: 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979

Michel Larocque: 1977, 1978, 1979, 1981

Richard Sevigny: 1981

Denis Herron: 1981

Patrick Roy: 1989, 1990, 1992

Jose Theodore: 2002

Carey Price: 2015

A total of 37 goaltenders have played at least 20 games in one regular season for the Habs and I have ranked them from the worst to the best.

37 Herb Rheaume

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Herb Rheaume played one season with the Montreal Canadiens in 1925-26.

He was called upon to replace the great Georges Vezina who was at the time suffering from tuberculosis and just a few months later would pass away.

After signing his contract with the Canadiens, the 6 foot tall, 200 pound Rheaume played 31 regular season games and earned 10 wins (with no shutouts), 20 losses and 1 tie, along with a 2.92 goals against average. He didn’t appear in any playoff games with them.

The Habs did not have a good season in 1925-26. In fact, just before the end of the season, they suffered a twelve-game losing streak. Needless to say, they finished the season ranked last in the league.

That was Herb Rheaume’s one and only season in the NHL.

36 Bert Gardiner

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After playing just one game with the New York Rangers, Bert Gardiner was traded to the Montreal Canadiens in April 1940 in exchange for Claude Bourque.

The 5’11, 160 pound goaltender played a total of 52 regular season games with Montreal between 1940 and 1942. He recorded just 14 wins (including 2 shutouts), 31 losses and 7 ties, along with a 3.00 goals against average. He also played three playoff games and tallied one win.

During his two seasons in Montreal, he recorded way more losses than wins – 13 wins, 23 losses in 1940-41 and just 1 win and 8 losses in 1941-42.

After a pretty disappointing time in Montreal, he was loaned to the Chicago Blackhawks for the 1942-43 season. The Canadiens then traded him to the Boston Bruins in October 1943 in exchange for some cash.

35 David Aebischer

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David Aebischer began his career with the Colorado Avalanche before being traded to the Montreal Canadiens in March 2006 in exchange for Jose Theodore. The Habs thought they were getting a pretty decent net minder since he had posted 89 wins in 174 games with Colorado and helped them win a Stanley Cup in 2001. But that’s not how things turned out in Montreal.

This 6’1, 187 pound goaltender played just 39 regular season games with the Habs between 2006 and 2007. He posted 17 wins, 15 losses and 3 overtime/shootout losses. He never earned a shutout while he was with them. He also had a disappointing 3.28 goals against average, along with a .898 save percentage.

After failing to prove himself with the Canadiens, they didn’t re-sign him and he ended up going with the Phoenix Coyotes.

34 Claude Bourque

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Claude Bourque had a pretty short NHL career. The 5’6, 140 pound goaltender played two seasons with the Montreal Canadiens from 1938 to 1940. During that time he appeared in 61 regular season games and recorded 16 wins (including 4 shutouts), 37 losses and 8 ties, along with a 3.02 goals against average. He also appeared in 3 playoff games with them and tallied just one win.

During the 1939-40 season, Montreal loaned him to Detroit and he played one game with the Red Wings, but lost that game 3-1 against the New York Rangers. Then in April 1940, the Canadiens traded him to the New York Rangers in exchange for Bert Gardiner. But Claude Bourque never played another NHL game after that.

33 Pat Jablonski

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Prior to joining the Montreal Canadiens, Pat Jablonski played for the St. Louis Blues and Tampa Bay Lightning. The Blues traded him in November 1995 to the Canadiens in exchange for J.J. Daigneault. Prior to joining the Habs, he was unable to earn more than 8 wins in a single season, so it wasn’t a surprise when he was less than impressive during his time in Montreal.

The 6 foot tall, 178 pound goaltender played a total of 40 regular season games with the Habs between the 1995-96 and 1996-97 seasons. He tallied just 9 wins (with no shutouts), 15 losses, 8 ties and 2 overtime losses, along with a disappointing 3.33 goals against average and a .899 save percentage. He only appeared in one playoff game with them.

After recording just 4 wins in 17 games during his second season with them, the Canadiens traded him in March 1997 to the Phoenix Coyotes in exchange for Steve Cheredaryk.

32 Paul Bibeault

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Paul Bibeault spent the first three years of his NHL career with the Canadiens from 1940 to 1943. Then after spending some time with the Toronto Maple Leafs and Boston Bruins (he was on loan to both teams), he made his way back to the Canadiens for the end of the 1945-46 season.

The 5’9, 160 pound goaltender played a total of 102 regular season games with the Habs and recorded 41 wins (including 2 shutouts), 46 losses and 14 ties, along with a pretty high 3.55 goals against average. He also appeared in 8 playoff games and tallied just 2 wins.

After a disappointing time in Montreal, they traded him in September 1946 to the Chicago Blackhawks and that’s where he spent the last year of his NHL career.

31 Steve Penney

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Steve Penney spent the first three years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1983-84 to 1985-86.

During that time, he played 76 regular season games and produced 32 wins (including one shutout), 30 losses and 10 ties, along with a very hefty 3.45 goals against average and a .865 save percentage. He also appeared in 27 playoff games and earned 15 wins including 4 shutouts.

Of the three seasons he played for Montreal, his best one was in 1984-85 when he produced 26 wins in 54 games. However, his goals against average totals were horrible. In two of the three seasons, he had a GAA that was well over the 4.00 mark.

In August 1986, the Montreal Canadiens traded Steve Penney and the rights to Jan Ingman to the Winnipeg Jets in exchange for Brian Hayward.

30 Jeff Hackett

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After spending the first ten years of his NHL career between the New York Islanders, San Jose Sharks and Chicago Blackhawks, Jeff Hackett found his way to the Montreal Canadiens in November 1998. Chicago traded him, along with Eric Weinrich, Alain Nasreddine and a fourth round draft pick, to Montreal in exchange for Jocelyn Thibault, Dave Manson and Brad Brown.

The 6’1, 198 pound goaltender played a total of 161 regular season games with the Canadiens between 1998 and 2003. He earned 63 wins (including 8 shutouts), 68 losses, 22 ties and 8 overtime losses, along with a 2.53 goals against average and a .912 save percentage. He didn’t appear in any playoff games with them.

He suffered several injuries during his time in Montreal and was eventually traded to the San Jose Sharks in January 2003 in exchange for Niklas Sundstrom and a third round draft pick.

29 Andre Racicot

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Andre Racicot spent his entire five-year NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1989-90 to 1993-94.

The 5’11, 165 pound goaltender played a total of 68 regular season games and tallied 26 wins (including 2 shutouts), 23 losses, 8 ties and 1 overtime loss, along with a hefty 3.50 goals against average and a .880 save percentage. He also appeared in four playoff games but didn’t earn any wins. He did, however, help them win the Stanley Cup in 1993.

He only had one decent season with the Canadiens and that was in 1992-93 when he produced 17 wins in 26 games (the same year they won the Stanley Cup). Other than that, he failed to record more than 7 wins in a single season. Also, in each of the five seasons that he played for them, his goals against average was over the 3.00 mark.

28 Wilf Cude

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Prior to joining the Montreal Canadiens in 1933, Wilf Cude played for the Philadelphia Quakers, Boston Bruins and Chicago Blackhawks. He only played one game for the Canadiens during the 1933-34 season and was lent out to the Red Wings for the remainder of the season and the playoffs where he helped Detroit get to the Stanley Cup Finals.

He played a total of 220 regular season games with the Canadiens between the 1933-34 and 1940-41 seasons. The 5’9, 146 pound goaltender posted 82 wins (including 18 shutouts), 100 losses and 38 ties, along with a 2.65 goals against average. He also appeared in ten playoff games with them and recorded three wins.

He retired after his final season with the Montreal Canadiens in 1941.

27 Jocelyn Thibault

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After spending the first three years of his NHL career with the Quebec Nordiques/Colorado Avalanche, they traded Jocelyn Thibault to the Montreal Canadiens, along with Martin Rucinsky and Andrei Kovalenko in December 1995 in exchange for Patrick Roy and Mike Keane.

The 5’11, 169 pound Thibault played a total of 158 regular season games with the Canadiens between the 1995-96 and 1998-99 seasons. He recorded 67 wins (including 7 shutouts), 56 losses, 24 ties and 4 overtime losses, along with a 2.73 goals against average and a .908 save percentage. He also appeared in 11 playoff games and tallied 2 wins.

At best, he was a mediocre goaltender, having recorded slightly over 20 wins in two of his four seasons with Montreal. He also didn’t have a goals against average any better than a 2.47.

In November 1998, the Montreal Canadiens traded Jocelyn Thibault, Dave Manson and Brad Brown to the Chicago Blackhawks in exchange for Jeff Hackett, Eric Weinrich, Alain Nasreddine and a fourth round draft pick.

26 Philippe Myre

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Philippe Myre spent the first three seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens between 1969-70 and 1971-72.

During that time, he played 49 regular season games and tallied 21 wins (including one shutout), 19 losses and 6 ties, along with a pretty hefty 3.06 goals against average. He didn’t appear in any playoff games with them.

He was less than impressive during his time in Montreal. In two of his three seasons, his goals against average was over the 3.00 mark. He also failed to earn more than 13 wins in a single season.

As a matter of fact, during his entire fourteen-year NHL career, he did not record any higher than 18 wins in a single season. Also, in those fourteen years, only two seasons did he have a GAA less than 3.00.

25 Doug Soetaert

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Doug Soetaert spent the first nine years of his NHL career playing for the New York Rangers and Winnipeg Jets. The Jets then traded him in October 1984 to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Mark Holden.

The 6 foot tall, 180 pound goaltender played a total of 51 regular season games with the Habs from 1984 to 1986. He recorded 25 wins (including 3 shutouts), 16 losses and 6 ties, along with a disappointing 3.13 goals against average and a .873 save percentage. He also appeared in one playoff game with them. Although he didn’t play much, he was a part of their Stanley Cup winning team in 1986.

Despite recording slightly more wins than losses, his time in Montreal was less than impressive. He spent the following season (which was also his last in the NHL) back with his former team, the New York Rangers.

24 Richard Sevigny

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Richard Sevigny spent the first five seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1979-80 to 1983-84.

During that time, he played a total of 141 regular season games and earned 67 wins (including 4 shutouts), 41 losses and 17 ties, along with a 3.10 goals against average and a .876 save percentage. He also appeared in four playoff games but didn’t earn any wins.

Although in only one of his five seasons did he record more losses than wins, he still didn’t have a very impressive career with the Canadiens. In fact, his goals against average in each of those five seasons was no better than a 2.40 and in three of those seasons it was over the 3.00 mark.

He was, however, awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1981 for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalies, Denis Herron and Michel Larocque.

Sevigny went on to play with the Quebec Nordiques for the last three seasons of his NHL career.

23 Andy Moog

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In July 1997, the Montreal Canadiens signed Andy Moog as a free agent. Prior to joining the Canadiens, he played for the Edmonton Oilers, Boston Bruins and Dallas Stars. It was pretty clear that he was at the end of his long NHL career when he joined the Habs, as he only played one season with them in 1997-98 and it was a mediocre one to say the least.

During his season with Montreal, he played 42 regular season games and recorded 18 wins (including 3 shutouts), 17 losses, 5 ties and 3 overtime losses, along with a 2.49 goals against average and a .905 save percentage. He also appeared in 9 playoff games and tallied 4 wins including one shutout.

After his season with Montreal, Andy Moog retired.

22 Mike Condon

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Mike Condon spent his rookie season in 2015-16 with the Montreal Canadiens. The 6’2, 197 pound goaltender was playing as Montreal’s backup until Carey Price got injured in November 2015. Condon went from being a rookie backup to the number one goalie for the Habs.

He appeared in 55 regular season games and recorded 21 wins (including one shutout), 25 losses and 6 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.71 goals against average and .903 save percentage.

He made a great impression with Habs fans. He won his first four games of the season and also appeared in the NHL Winter Classic on January 1st against the Boston Bruins where he also recorded a big win. He was impressive for a young rookie not prepared to take over the number one spot when Price got injured.

Condon is currently playing for the Ottawa Senators.

21 Lorne Chabot

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Lorne Chabot spent the first seven years of his NHL career with the New York Rangers and Toronto Maple Leafs. Then in October 1933, the Maple Leafs traded him to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for George Hainsworth.

The 6’1, 185 pound goaltender spent only one season with the Canadiens, playing 47 regular season games with them and recording 21 wins (including 8 shutouts), 20 losses and 6 ties, along with a 2.07 goals against average. He also appeared in two playoff games with them, but lost them both.

After just one season with Montreal, he was traded again in October 1934, along with Howie Morenz and Marty Burke, to Chicago in exchange for Lionel Conacher, Leroy Goldsworthy and Roger Jenkins. Chabot spent the last three seasons of his NHL career playing for the Chicago Blackhawks, Montreal Maroons and New York Americans.

20 Peter Budaj

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After spending the first six seasons of his NHL career with the Colorado Avalanche, the Montreal Canadiens signed Peter Budaj to a contract in 2011. Prior to joining the Habs, the 6’1, 195 pound goaltender had a mediocre record of 101 wins, 91 losses and 27 overtime/shootout losses in 242 regular season games.

His numbers remained pretty much mediocre during his time with the Canadiens, playing in 54 regular season games and posting 23 wins (including 2 shutouts), 16 losses and 9 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.47 goals against average and a .910 save percentage. He also appeared in three playoff games with them, but didn’t win any of them.

In October 2014, he was traded, along with Patrick Holland, to the Winnipeg Jets in exchange for Eric Tangradi. Budaj is currently playing for the Tampa Bay Lightning.

19 Wayne Thomas

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Wayne Thomas spent the first two seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1972-73 to 1973-74.

During that time, the 6’2, 195 pound goaltender played a total of 52 regular season games with them and racked up 31 wins (including 2 shutouts), 13 losses and 5 ties, along with a 2.69 goals against average. He didn’t appear in any playoff games with them.

He put up pretty decent numbers during his time in Montreal. During the 1973-74 season, he produced 23 wins in 42 games. In his entire eight-year NHL career, he only earned more than 23 wins on one occasion (28 wins with Toronto in 1975-76).

In June 1975, the Montreal Canadiens traded Wayne Thomas to the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for a first round draft pick.

18 Rick Wamsley

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Rick Wamsley spent the first four seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1980-81 to 1983-84.

During that time, the 5’11, 185 pound goaltender played a total of 131 regular season games and accumulated 72 wins (including 5 shutouts), 36 losses and 16 ties, along with a 3.29 goals against average and a .867 save percentage. He also appeared in 9 playoff games with them and tallied two wins.

In 1982, he was awarded the William M. Jennings Trophy for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Denis Herron.

In his entire thirteen-year NHL career, his best season was with the Montreal Canadiens in 1982-83 when he produced 27 wins in 46 games.

In June 1984, the Canadiens traded Rick Wamsley, along with two second round draft picks and a third round draft pick, to the St. Louis Blues in exchange for a first round draft pick and a second round pick.

17 Jaroslav Halak

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Jaroslav Halak spent the first four years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 2006 to 2010.

The 5’11, 181 pound goaltender played a total of 101 regular season games with them and earned 56 wins (including 9 shutouts), 34 losses and 7 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.62 goals against average and a .919 save percentage. He put up pretty impressive numbers, earning more wins than losses in each of his four seasons with them. He also appeared in 21 playoff games with them and recorded 9 wins.

In June 2010, he was traded to the St. Louis Blues in exchange for Lars Eller and Ian Schultz.

Jaroslav Halak is still playing in the NHL and is currently with the New York Islanders.

16 Brian Hayward

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Brian Hayward spent the first four years of his NHL career with the Winnipeg Jets. Then in August 1986 he was traded to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Steve Penney and the rights to Jan Ingman.

The 5’10, 180 pound goaltender spent the next four seasons (from 1986 to 1990) with the Canadiens and earned 71 wins (including 5 shutouts), 48 losses, 17 ties and 1 overtime loss, along with a 2.96 goals against average and a .889 save percentage in 141 regular season games. He also appeared in 20 playoff games and recorded 9 wins.

During his time with the Habs, he was awarded three consecutive William M. Jennings Trophies (1987, 1988 and 1989) for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared all three trophies with Montreal’s other goalie, Patrick Roy.

In November 1990, Brian Hayward was traded to the Minnesota North Stars for Jayson More.

15 Cristobal Huet

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Cristobal Huet spent the first two years of his NHL career with the Los Angeles Kings. Then in June 2004, they traded him, along with Radek Bonk, to the Montreal Canadiens in exchange for Mathieu Garon and a third round draft pick.

The 6’1, 205 pound Huet played a total of 117 regular season games with the Habs between the 2005-06 and 2007-08 seasons. He earned 58 wins (including 11 shutouts), 39 losses and 13 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.53 goals against average and a .920 save percentage. He also appeared in 6 playoff games and won two of them.

He was awarded the Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award in 2006 for having the best save percentage among all NHL goaltenders who had played at least 25 regular season games. He had a .929 save percentage that year.

He had a pretty decent career with the Canadiens, having recorded more wins than losses in all three seasons he played for them. In fact, he began the 2007-08 season with 21 wins in 39 games before getting traded to the Washington Capitals in February 2008 in exchange for a second round draft pick.

14 Denis Herron

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Prior to joining the Montreal Canadiens, Denis Herron spent several seasons with the Pittsburgh Penguins and Kansas City Scouts. Then in August 1979, the Penguins traded him, along with a second round draft pick, to the Canadiens in exchange for Pat Hughes and Rob Holland.

Herron spent three seasons with Montreal from 1979 to 1982. He played a total of 86 regular season games and racked up 43 wins (including 4 shutouts), 18 losses and 17 ties, along with a 2.80 goals against average. He also appeared in 5 playoff games and tallied 2 wins.

During his time with the Canadiens, he was awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1981 for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Michel Larocque and Richard Sevigny. Beginning the following season (and continuing to this very day), the Vezina Trophy would be awarded to the best goalie in the league.

The following year, in 1982, he was given the first ever William M. Jennings Trophy for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Rick Wamsley.

In September 1982, the Montreal Canadiens traded Denis Herron back to the Pittsburgh Penguins in exchange for a third round draft pick.

13 Jose Theodore

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Jose Theodore spent the first nine years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens beginning with the 1995-96 season and ending during the 2005-06 season.

During that time, the 5’11, 172 pound goaltender played a total of 353 regular season games and earned 141 wins (including 23 shutouts), 158 losses, 30 ties and 24 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.62 goals against average and a .911 save percentage. He also appeared in 28 playoff games and recorded 11 wins including one shutout.

He was awarded three trophies in 2002: The Vezina Trophy for being the best goalie in the league; the Hart Memorial Trophy for being the most valuable player during the regular season; and the Roger Crozier Saving Grace Award for having the best save percentage among all NHL goaltenders who have played at least 25 regular season games. He had a .931 save percentage that year.

Even more impressive is the fact that he became only the third goaltender in NHL history to have received the Vezina and Hart trophies in the same year (along with Jacques Plante and Dominik Hasek).

After a decent run with Montreal, they traded him in March 2006 to the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for David Aebischer.

12 Charlie Hodge

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Charlie Hodge spent the first nine years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens between 1954 and 1967.

During that time, the 5’6, 150 pound goaltender played a total of 237 regular season games with them and accumulated 115 wins (including 21 shutouts), 72 losses and 40 ties, along with a 2.46 goals against average. He also appeared in 16 playoff games and earned 7 wins including 2 shutouts. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1965.

He was awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1964 and 1966 for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He won it alone in 1964, but shared it with Montreal’s other goalie, Lorne Worsley, in 1966.

After his time with the Montreal Canadiens, Charlie Hodge went on to play for the Oakland Seals and the Vancouver Canucks.

11 Gerry McNeil

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Gerry McNeil spent his entire seven-year NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens between the 1947-48 and 1956-57 seasons.

The 5’7, 155 pound goaltender played a total of 276 regular season games and produced 119 wins (including 28 shutouts), 105 losses and 52 ties, along with a 2.36 goals against average. He also appeared in 35 playoff games and earned 17 wins including 5 shutouts. His incredible 1.89 GAA in the playoffs ranks him second best in franchise history (behind George Hainsworth). McNeil helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1953 and 1957.

In all four seasons that McNeil played over ten games, he racked up at least 25 regular season wins. His best season was in 1951-52 when he recorded 34 wins in 70 games.

10 Lorne Worsley

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After spending the first ten seasons of his NHL career with the New York Rangers, Lorne “Gump” Worsley finally found his way to the Montreal Canadiens. In June 1963, the Montreal Canadiens traded Jacques Plante, Don Marshall and Phil Goyette to the New York Rangers in exchange for Lorne Worsley, Dave Balon, Leon Rochefort and Len Ronson.

Worsley spent the next seven years with the Canadiens from 1963 to 1970. During that time, he played a total of 172 regular season games and earned 92 wins (including 16 shutouts), 44 losses and 25 ties, along with a 2.42 goals against average. He also appeared in 39 playoff games with them and recorded 29 wins including 4 shutouts. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1965, 1966, 1968 and 1969.

He was awarded the Vezina Trophy in 1966 and 1968 for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. In 1966, he shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Charlie Hodge. Then in 1968, he shared it with Rogatien Vachon.

After a successful career in Montreal, they traded him in February 1970 to the Minnesota North Stars in exchange for some cash.

Lorne Worsley was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1980.

9 Georges Vezina

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Georges Vezina is definitely one of the most recognized and well respected goaltenders to have ever played the game. He spent his entire sixteen-year NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1910 to 1925.

The 5’6, 185 pound goaltender played a total of 328 regular season games and earned 175 wins (including 15 shutouts), 146 losses and 6 ties, along with a 3.42 goals against average. He also appeared in 26 playoff games and recorded 16 wins. He helped the Canadiens win their first ever Stanley Cup in 1916, followed by their second one in 1924.

On February 18, 1918, Vezina became the first NHL goaltender to record a shutout in a 9-0 win against the Toronto Arenas. Then in December, he became the first NHL goalie to record a point with an assist on a goal by Newsy Lalonde.

Georges Vezina was among the first players to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame when it was founded in 1945.

After his passing from tuberculosis in 1926, the NHL honored his memory by creating the Vezina Trophy which, up until the 1981-82 season, it was given to the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. From 1982 and continuing to this very day, the trophy is given yearly to the best goalie in the league.

8 Rogatien Vachon

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Rogatien Vachon’s career began with the Montreal Canadiens from 1966-67 to 1971-72.

During that time, the 5’7, 170 pound goaltender played a total of 206 regular season games and produced 110 wins (including 13 shutouts), 56 losses and 30 ties, along with a 2.65 goals against average. He also appeared in 19 playoff games and racked up 14 wins including one shutout. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1968, 1969 and 1971.

Also in 1968, he was awarded the Vezina Trophy for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Lorne Worsley.

He had a great career with the Canadiens, having posted over 20 wins in four different seasons. He even racked up 31 wins in 1969-70. In fact, in his entire sixteen-year career, he only posted more than 31 wins on one occasion (33 wins in 1976-77 with Los Angeles).

In November 1971, the Montreal Canadiens traded Rogatien Vachon to the Los Angeles Kings in exchange for Denis DeJordy, Dale Hoganson, Noel Price and Doug Robinson.

Vachon was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2016.

7 Bill Durnan

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Bill Durnan spent his entire seven-year NHL career with the Canadiens from 1943 to 1950 and even served a short time as their team captain during the 1947-48 season. The 6 foot tall, 190 pound goaltender played a total of 383 regular season games and recorded 208 wins (including 34 shutouts), 112 losses and 62 ties, along with a 2.36 goals against average. He also appeared in 45 playoff games and posted 27 wins including 2 shutouts.

He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1944 and 1946. He was also awarded six Vezina Trophies (1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1949 and 1950) for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season.

During the 1948-49 season, Durnan had an incredible four consecutive shutouts from February 26 to March 6 with his streak lasting 309 minutes and 21 seconds. His record remained for several decades until Brian Boucher of the Phoenix Coyotes broke it in 2004.

Among all Canadiens goalies in franchise history, Durnan is ranked fifth with 208 wins and 34 shutouts in the regular season. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1964.

6 Michel Larocque

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Michel “Bunny” Larocque spent the first eight years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1973 to 1981.

During that time, the 5’10, 200 pound goaltender played a total of 231 regular season games and racked up 144 wins (including 17 shutouts), 48 losses and 31 ties, along with a 2.83 goals against average. He also appeared in 12 playoff games and earned 6 wins including one shutout. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1979.

He was awarded four Vezina Trophies (1977, 1978, 1979 and 1981) for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. In 1977, 1978 and 1979, he shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Ken Dryden. In 1981, he shared it with Denis Herron and Richard Sevigny.

In March 1981, the Montreal Canadiens traded Michel Larocque to the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for Robert Picard.

5 Carey Price

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Carey Price has spent his entire ten-year NHL career so far with the Montreal Canadiens beginning with the 2007-08 season and continuing to this very day.

So far, the 6’3, 226 pound goaltender has played 498 regular season games and produced 263 wins (including 39 shutouts), 171 losses and 55 overtime/shootout losses, along with a 2.41 goals against average and a .920 save percentage. He has also appeared in 54 playoff games and recorded 23 wins including 5 shutouts.

He is currently ranked third among all goaltenders in franchise history in games played. And he just passed Ken Dryden’s total to take over third place in wins.

His best season to date was in 2014-15 when he produced 44 wins in 66 games. In fact, he was awarded four different trophies that season: the Vezina Trophy for being the best goalie in the league; the Ted Lindsay Award for being the “most outstanding player” in the NHL; the William M. Jennings Trophy for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season (shared with Corey Crawford of the Chicago Blackhawks); and the Hart Memorial Trophy for being the most valuable player during the regular season.

By winning the Vezina and Hart trophies in the same season, he became only the fourth goaltender in NHL history to do so (along with Jacques Plante, Dominik Hasek and Jose Theodore).

So far this season (2016-17), Carey Price has 30 wins in 51 games played with Montreal.

4 George Hainsworth

via digitaljournal.com

George Hainsworth spent the first seven years of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1926 to 1933. Then after spending a few seasons with the Toronto Maple Leafs, he returned to the Habs and played the last four games of his career with them during the 1936-37 season.

The 5’6, 150 pound goaltender played a total of 318 regular season games with the Canadiens and racked up 167 wins, 97 losses and 54 ties, along with a fantastic 1.78 goals against average. He earned an incredible 75 shutouts, which ranks him first overall among all Canadiens goaltenders in franchise history. His 1.78 GAA also ranks him first overall among all goalies who have played more than one game with the Habs. He served as Montreal’s team captain during the 1932-33 season.

He also appeared in 31 playoff games and recorded 13 wins including 6 shutouts. His amazing 1.70 GAA in the playoffs ranks him first overall among all goalies in franchise history. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1930 and 1931. He was also awarded three consecutive Vezina Trophies (1927, 1928 and 1929) which at the time was given to the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season.

George Hainsworth was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1961.

3 Patrick Roy

via si.com

Patrick Roy spent the first twelve seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1984-85 to 1995-96.

During that time, the 6’2, 190 pound goaltender played a total of 551 regular season games and racked up 289 wins (including 29 shutouts), 175 losses, 66 ties and 16 overtime losses, along with a 2.78 goals against average and a .908 save percentage. Among all goaltenders in franchise history, he ranks second in games played and wins.

He also appeared in 114 playoff games and earned 70 wins including 5 shutouts. He helped the Canadiens win the Stanley Cup in 1986 and 1993. His 114 playoff games ranks him first overall among all goalies in franchise history. He’s ranked second in wins.

During his time with the Canadiens, he was awarded several trophies:

4 William M. Jennings Trophies (1987, 1988, 1989 and 1992) for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Brian Hayward, in 1987, 1988 and 1989. He won it alone in 1992.

3 Vezina Trophies (1989, 1990 and 1992) for being the best goaltender in the league.

2 Conn Smythe Trophies (1986 and 1993) for being the most valuable player in the playoffs.

Patrick Roy’s amazing career with the Montreal Canadiens came to an end in December 1995 when he and Mike Keane were traded to the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for Martin Rucinsky, Andrei Kovalenko and Jocelyn Thibault.

Roy was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2006. Then on November 22, 2008, his number 33 jersey was retired by the Montreal Canadiens.

2 Ken Dryden

via NHL.com

Ken Dryden spent his entire eight-year NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1970 to 1979. The large 6’4, 205 pound goaltender played a total of 397 regular season games and recorded 258 wins (including 46 shutouts), 57 losses and 74 ties, along with a 2.24 goals against average. He also appeared in 112 playoff games and racked up 80 wins including 10 shutouts.

He helped the Canadiens win six Stanley Cups in 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979. He was awarded five Vezina Trophies (1973, 1976, 1977, 1978 and 1979) for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season. He shared the trophy with Montreal’s other goalie, Michel Larocque, in 1977, 1978 and 1979. He was also the recipient of the Conn Smythe Trophy in 1971 for being the most valuable player in the playoffs. And he received the Calder Trophy in 1972 for being the rookie of the year.

Dryden sure made an impact with the Canadiens and he is currently ranked fourth among all goalies in franchise history with 258 wins and is ranked third with 46 shutouts during the regular season. As for playoff records, he is ranked first with 80 wins and is tied with Jacques Plante with 10 shutouts each.

Ken Dryden was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1983. His number 29 jersey was then retired by the Montreal Canadiens on January 29, 2007.

1 Jacques Plante

via Puckstruck.com

When we think of the greatest goalies who have ever played the game, the name Jacques Plante certainly comes to mind. The 6 foot tall, 175 pound goaltender spent the first eleven seasons of his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens from 1952-53 to 1962-63.

During that time, he played a total of 556 regular season games with them and racked up 314 wins (including 58 shutouts), 133 losses and 107 ties, along with a 2.23 goals against average. In fact, he leads all goaltenders in franchise history in games played and wins.

He also appeared in 90 playoff games and produced 59 wins including 10 shutouts. He helped the Canadiens win six Stanley Cups in 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959 and 1960.

During his time with the Habs, he was awarded six Vezina Trophies in 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960 and 1962 for being the goaltender of the team who allowed the fewest goals scored against them during the regular season (he won it again in 1969 with the St. Louis Blues). He was also awarded the Hart Memorial Trophy in 1962 for being the most valuable player during the regular season. As a matter of fact, he became the first ever goaltender in NHL history to win both the Vezina and Hart trophies in the same season.

In seven of his eleven seasons with Montreal, he racked up over 30 regular season wins. In fact, he did it for six consecutive seasons from 1954-55 to 1959-60, then again in 1961-62.

Jacques Plante was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1978. Then on October 7, 1995, the Montreal Canadiens retired his number 1 jersey.

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