TheSportster.com

Top 15 Epic Mullets in NHL History

Many people believe that the mullet is an invention of 1980s fashion in the United States. That’s definitely when the style was at the height of its popularity, but many scholars claim the mullet dates back as far as 2500 BC. That’s (approximately) when the Ancient Egyptians built the Great Sphinx of Giza, which is said to sport the earliest mullet in recorded history.

Thousands of years later, Roman warriors were forced to cut their mullets before battle. No one could deny the fact that they looked amazing, but it was far too easy for their enemies to grab the back of their hair, pull them close and slit their throats. What a bummer.

Today we pay our respects to the mullet’s role in the game of hockey. This distinguished hair-do has had a place in the sport for as long as I can remember, but its prominence is slowly fading away along with head shots and fighting. Of course, we’ll all miss the mullet the most out of all of these once they’re gone for good.

With the news this season that Jaromir Jagr will be growing back his glorious mullet, how could we not do a list of hockey’s greatest mullets? Jagr’s was one of the best around and I for one am pumped for the return of those beautiful locks.

Hockey players’ mullets had as much to do with the fashion of the era as they did the game of hockey, so we’re not entirely sure why the “business in the front, party in the back” hairstyle became so closely associated with the sport. Maybe it’s because hockey is such a fast sport, and when a guy with a sweet mullet gets a full head of steam, his locks flow behind him and it looks God damned majestic.

There are many different types of mullet, many of which are represented in this list. Get ready to feast your eyes on some amazing heads of hair as we present you with the best mullets hockey has ever seen.

15 Michal Handzus

via buzzfed.com

So we’re going to start the list off with Michal Handzus. Although his haircut never exactly fit the description of a traditional mullet, it appeared as though he had a fantastic looking mullet when he had a helmet on.

14 Patrick Kane

Jon Durr-USA TODAY Sports

It has become a spring tradition in Chicago. If the puck is about to drop on the postseason for the Blackhawks, so is Kane’s stylish mullet, complete with racing stripes shaved into the side.

13 Ryan Smyth

via oilersnation.com

Ryan Smyth was a fan favorite in Edmonton for almost two decades, and his mullet was just as popular as the man himself. Fans would love it when he’d park himself in front of the opposing goalie, greasy mullet all up in his face.

12 Ken Baumgartner

via vintageleafs.blogspot.com

Ken Baumgartner was a veteran of nearly 700 NHL games, and he played the bulk of his career throughout the 1990s. He had a sweet mullet for pretty much the entirety of his NHL career, but I would say that it peaked in the early ‘90s as a member of the New York Islanders.

11 Wendel Clark

via pinterest.com

Wendel Clark isn’t remembered for his mullet, because he played most of his NHL career with short hair. It’s a shame that it doesn’t get much credit, because when his mullet was at the height of its glory, it rivaled the best.

10 Chris Simon

via calgaryherald.com

There are a handful of pesky pugilists who show up on our mullet list and Chris Simon comes in at number 10. Simon’s mullet is still one of the longest on record, suggesting his party side was beginning to possess his business side.

9 Guy Lafleur

via icehockey.wikia.com

Sometimes, a mullet’s grandiosity is exaggerated when it’s attached to a spectacular skater. Guy Lafleur was a prime example of this. It’s not that his mullet itself was too greasy, but the image of the hair flowing behind him as he flew past defensemen became iconic.

8 Brian Engblom

via scribblelive.com

Brian Engblom is a veteran reporter who has worked for multiple outlets throughout the U.S. prior to his reporting career, which started in the early ‘90s. He was also an NHL defenseman who played over 650 NHL games for five different teams.

7 Ron Duguay

via totalprosports.com

Ron Duguay’s NHL career started in the 1970s and ended in 1989, which is essentially the exact timeline of the mullet’s glory days. What made Duguay’s mullet so special was that his hair had a subtle curl to it, and it looked amazing.

6 Marty McSorley

via cbsboston.com

I don’t know if there was once a belief that a mullet made you look tough or something, but I’m noticing a theme in this list. Noted pest and pugilist Marty McSorley comes in at number six, and might I say it’s well-deserved.

5 Barry Melrose

via mayorsmanor.com

Barry Melrose hasn’t really been anybody’s favorite anything throughout his career as a player, coach and broadcaster. He does hold the distinction of rocking our fifth-favorite mullet the game has ever seen, though.

4 Wayne Gretzky

via buzzfed.com

The man who would end up as the best player of all-time on 90 percent of fans’ lists ends up at number four in our NHL mullet rankings. Perhaps Wayne Gretzky’s mullet is ranked a little high because of who it belongs to, but if you ask me nobody looked better than Gretz in a mullet.

3 Ziggy Palffy

via calgaryherald.com

We’re getting to the heavy hitters now, and this one is an absolute beauty. Ziggy Palffy didn’t always rock a mullet, but when he did it was one of the best mullets that hockey had ever seen. It still is to this day, as reflected by our number three ranking.

2 Jaromir Jagr

via tsn.ca

There’s definitely an argument that can be made for Jagr owning the top spot on this list, but he squeaks in at number two instead. There were many versions of the Jagr mullet, but I would say the best one was the one he wore circa-1997-98 while with the Penguins.

1 Al Iafrate

via thescore.ca

Al Iafrate is probably known more for his blistering slap shot than he is this incredible mullet, but we’re more impressed by the mullet. To be fair, this is a unique sub-genre of the mullet, popularly referred to as the “skullet.”

Sweet Baby Jesus, just look at that thing. Who knows if he lost a bet with a teammate, did it on a dare, or was aiming to attract a specific niche of puck bunnies. Iafrate was perennially a participant in the NHL Skills Competition throughout the 1990s because of his hard shot, and that’s when fans were treated to the skullet in full view, as players would compete helmet-less. Long live the Iafrate skullet.

Give TheSportster a Thumbs up!

Looking for an AD FREE EXPERIENCE on TheSportster?

Get Your Free Access Now!

More in NHL

Top 15 Epic Mullets in NHL History