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15 Wrestling Terms Most Fans Didn’t Know Before The Internet

In this age of shoot videos, wrestling blogs, and assorted podcasts, the way fans talk about professional wrestling reflects the shoptalk of the industry. Everyone is smart to the business thanks to the slaying of kayfabe. After several years of listening to insiders talk candidly about their craft, the vocabulary of the average fan has expanded vastly. Fans now confidently use parlance that for years had been the dominion of wrestlers and promoters. Whether this makes fans sound respectably knowledgeable or plainly out of their depth is a matter of conjecture. What is more certain is the lingo fans use is not the same as it had been just a decade and a half ago.

The Internet is more responsible for this than any other factor. Rather than a select pocket of fans having access to dirt sheets of yore, everyone has access to everything anyone writes or posts about the business. Fans watch or listen to shoot interviews and feel they’re part of a conversation. Bloggers and podcasters use this unveiled terminology to lend authenticity to what they write and say. This is a natural extension of the exposure of the business. It’s given fans new jargon to toss around. Below are fifteen terms few if any fans tossed around before the Internet got its hands on the business.

15 Workrate

via thetoplister.wordpress.com

14 The Product

via realmenreport.com

13 Sell/Selling

via lipstickalley.com

12 Drew a Number/House

via wrestlingnews.co

11 Incident

via betweentheropes.com

10 Gorilla Position

via ringthedamnbell.wordpress.com

9 Go Over

via wrestleview.com

8 The Boys

via keyword-suggestions.com

7 Go Home

via youtube.com

6 Rib

via topropepress.com

5 Blow-Off

via dailywrestlingnews.com

4 Blow Up

via mmamania.com

3 Heat

via thebobbyjames.com

2 Botch

via andhrafriends.com

1 Pipe Bomb

via eyesonthering.com

Most of the terms on this list existed as business jargon before fans adopted them via the Internet. Not “pipe bomb.” Out of all these, this one is a child of the Internet age. When CM Punk donned a Steve Austin t-shirt and delivered his famous seated promo in 2011, the Internet embraced it as “the Pipe Bomb.” Punk had referred to the microphone as being a pipe bomb in his hand (although he said this after the promo that everyone calls “the Pipe Bomb”). Since that night, any promo that seems to be a thinly veiled or unscripted attack has become a “pipe bomb.” This is similar to the way “incident” has been used. The expression now is part of the wrestling lexicon. Unlike others on this list, “pipe bomb” always has been owned by the fans and never has been an insider expression. It still gets most of its mileage thanks to the Internet, though.

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15 Wrestling Terms Most Fans Didn’t Know Before The Internet