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15 WWE PPVs You Probably Forgot About

Throughout the years WWE has had a wide selection of PPVs presented to viewers each and every year. There's the big four: Royal Rumble, WrestleMania, SummerSlam and Survivor Series. Then there are other PPVs that come about in unexpected ways. For instance, both Money in the Bank and Tables, Ladders and Chairs (TLC) were originally high profile matches that would take place on other PPVs. Today, both of those stipulation matches have been given their own show with the Money in the Bank PPV taking place in June and the TLC PPV taking place in December.

While MITB and TLC are prime examples of the WWE creating two new PPVs that look to be staples for the company for years to come, this isn't always the case. Here, we take a look at fifteen WWE PPVs that you probably forgot about... for good reason.

17 Taboo Tuesday

via Wikimovies.net

The Taboo Tuesday PPV's theme centralized on the WWE viewers having the ability to book matches based on three stipulations presented by WWE on its website. At the conclusion of the voting period, the stipulation that received the most votes would be the match the competitors would engage in. The biggest problem with this PPV was the day of the week it occurred on, Tuesday. By scheduling a PPV on a Tuesday WWE set itself up for failure as no one is lining up to purchase a PPV event at the beginning of the week. A big fight feel is relegated towards the weekend not the beginning of the week. The PPV lasted a mere two years as it ran in both 2004 and 2005 before it was discarded.

16 Fatal 4-Way

via thedailyzombies.com

The Fatal 4-Way PPV was not only a one-off PPV, but it was also the last PPV that ever took place in Long Island, New York's Nassau Coliseum. In 2010, the WWE put together Fatal 4-Way and based on the name alone the idea of the show is practically given away. While not all of the matches on the card were between four competitors, the majority of them were, moreover, the more high profile matches with championships were. With the exception of the U.S. and Intercontinental belts, all championships were defended in Fatal 4-Way matches. It's clear that the WWE didn't think they had much going with the PPV considering it wasn't brought back the following year in 2011 and it hasn't been back ever since.

15 Breaking Point

via sportskeeda.com

Breaking Point took place in the home province of WWE Universal Champion, Kevin Owens and Sami Zayn of Quebec at the Bell Center in Montreal on September 13th, 2009. To date this is the only Breaking Point PPV to take place. The attendance of the event was nothing to marvel at is an estimated 12,000 fans failed to fill the stands. The event is most renown for the "Montreal Screwjob" that occurred in the CM Punk and Undertaker main event for the World Heavyweight Championship. While the Phenom had originally come out victorious by way of Punk submitting to his Hell's Gate submission, he didn't walk out of Montreal with gold on his waist. Instead Smackdown's Teddy Long came out to restart the match and stating that the Hell's Gate submission had been banned. Punk then applied his submission maneuver, the Anaconda Vice and the referee called for the bell despite Taker never tapping. Hence, we had a second Montreal Screwjob; but this was not one to talk about for years and years to come like the first one.

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13 Insurrextion

via hewwerumors.blogspot.ca

Yes, the PPV was called "Insurrextion"; that is not a typo. The Insurrextion PPV ran for four years from 2000-2003. The PPV might not be familiar to many, especially those outside of the United Kingdom as the show was specifically produced and geared towards the U.K. public/market. Canada was the only other market that aired the PPV with the exception of the U.S. also airing the show in 2002, but only in 2002. There were no gimmick matches that were central to the PPV. The first three Insurrextion PPV's took place in London with the first two taking place at Earl's Court Exhibition Centre and the last one taking place at Wembley Arena. The final show was in Newcastle at Telewest Arena in June 2003.

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11 St. Valentine's Day Massacre

via filmanic.com

In retrospect, the WWE probably wishes they never billed a PPV as the "St. Valentine's Day Massacre" when considering it refers to a real life incident in which seven individuals lost their lives as a result of an ongoing gang war between notorious gangsters Bugs Moran and Al Capone. Fortunately the WWE learned that the name shouldn't be a recurring thing as the PPV aired on Valentine's Day 1999 and hasn't ever since. While the name of the PPV was in poor judgment, the show absolutely delivered. For one, the PPV had the debuting "Giant" from the WCW ranks who was now simply referred to by his real name, Paul Wight (he would soon after be referred to as the Big Show). The Rock and Mankind duked it out for the WWE Championship in a last man standing match which ended with neither competitor claiming victory as it ended in a draw. Last but not least, Steve Austin beat out Vince McMahon to become the number one contender for the WWE Championship.

10 Capitol Punishment

via play.google.com

The Capitol Punishment PPV took place on June 19th, 2011 from the nation's capital in Washington D.C. The main event on the card featured an unlikely foil for the company's top star, John Cena. Cena's foe was a man who was now going as a "good" version of himself, R-Truth. Five years later, R-Truth is nothing more than a comedy act with Goldust. It's unclear as to whether or not the WWE had long term plans for this PPV as it was discarded the following year for the No Way Out PPV. It's unlikely that Capitol Punishment was a long term PPV as its name indicates that it would have to solely be broadcast from the Washington D.C. area. The PPV was good for 170,000 buys which made for a slightly above average buy total.

9 December to Dismember

via youtube.com

With the December to Dismember PPV, fans received a PPV consisting of "ECW talent"; the quotation marks signify that this wasn't the original version of ECW, but WWE's watered down version of ECW. The event only ended up drawing 4,800 fans to the James Brown Arena is Augusta, Georgia and it was fortunately not picked up for the following year's PPV schedule, nor was it picked up ever again. The main event of the show pitted Big Show (who had Paul Heyman in his corner) defending his ECW Championship against CM Punk, Test, Bobby Lashley, Hardcore Holly and ECW original, Rob Van Dam. Lashley seized the belt once the match concluded. Perhaps if WWE let the ECW original, RVD win the title this PPV would be remembered as opposed to forgotten.

8 Bragging Rights

via wallpapermade.com

Bragging Rights seemed to feature a theme that was no different than that of Survivor Series. The background of Bragging Rights was that WWE would pit Raw and Smackdown superstars against each other in a series of matches. This would include Raw superstars putting up their titles against Smackdown superstars and vice versa, stipulation matches and non stipulation matches. The team with more victories by the conclusion of the night would be the victor or to better put it, have "bragging rights". The PPV only lasted two years with it first taking place in 2009 and its last show taking place in 2010. To make matters worse, the final show at the Target Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota ended up drawing a paltry 9,000 fans to the arena.

7 The Bash

via wrestlezone.com

Most probably remember the PPV, "The Great American Bash"; but less probably remember the PPV named "The Bash". The Bash wasn't different from the Great American Bash; it was simply given a shortened name. The June 28th, 2009 show took place from Sacramento's ARCO Arena. The most prominent matchup of the night featured former Evolution member Triple H facing former Evolution member Randy Orton in a three stages of hell match. Orton ended up retaining in the main event matchup. The PPV ended up with 178,000 buys and attendance was just shy of 12,000. The Bash name never returned and the Great American Bash name returned in 2012 (there were no Bash shows in 2010 or 2011) as a PPV relegated towards the Smackdown brand.

6 Breakdown

via itcher.com

Breakdown, a part of the now defunct In Your House series of WWE PPVs, took place in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada on September 27th, 1998. The PPV was a successful one for the company as they filled the arena to capacity by drawing 17,405 fans. However, based upon it being a part of the In Your House series and being relegated to the calendar year as opposed to being a returning PPV, many viewers may have likely forgotten of its existence. The main event of the show featured the Brothers of Destruction, Kane and the Undertaker, in a triple threat match against Stone Cold Steve Austin who was defending his WWE Championship. Kane and the Undertaker actually came out on top- well, sort of. The two simultaneously pinned Austin but Vince McMahon declared neither the victor and held the belt up in captivity.

5 Rock Bottom

via youtube.com

Prior to The Rock having a television show, Smackdown, named after him he had a PPV, Rock Bottom, named after him. Rock Bottom was another PPV that was a part of the In Your House series and it took place at the former home of the Vancouver Canucks, General Motors Place. The event featured a number of intriguing and entertaining matches. The main event showcased the Undertaker against Steve Austin in a Buried Alive match which was right up Undertaker's alley. Despite the matchup being familiar territory for Undertaker, it was Austin who prevailed. Mankind also came out victorious against the Rock to claim the WWE Championship. The events of the evening are probably remembered by individuals; the name of the PPV, not so much.

4 Rebellion

via Wikimovies.net

The Rebellion PPV ran for four years from 1999-2002 and like Insurrextion was central to the U.K. market. Expanding on its similarities with Insurrextion, Rebellion was also only aired within the U.K. and Canada. However, unlike Insurrextion the show was never broadcast to the U.S. market. The show didn't contain any matches that only occurred at Rebellion; instead, the card simply featured a number of title and non-title matches. The 1999 show tool place in Birmingham, England at National Indoor Arena. The 2000 show took place in Sheffield, England at Sheffield Arena. The final two shows in 2001 and 2002 both took place in Manchester, England at Manchester Arena. The final show made for a rather odd occurrence as it was during the brand split and was recognized as a Smackdown PPV, yet it wan't shown to it's biggest market in the U.S.

3 This Tuesday in Texas

via youtube.com

One of the WWE's first PPV's outside of the big four took place on December 3rd, 1991 from San Antonio, Texas at the Freeman Coliseum. The Tuesday show was the first PPV aired by WWE on a Tuesday and to date is only one of two PPV's to air on a Tuesday with the other being Taboo Tuesday. The event only drew 8,000 fans and made for a distinctive showing as the PPV was not recurring. The card had its fair share of high profile matches such as the Undertaker defending his WWE Championship against Hulk Hogan and Ric Flair versing Roddy Piper in singles action. However, their card also had matches where one competitor significantly outmatched his opposition such as Bret Hart vs Skinner or the British Bulldog vs the Warlord.

2 New Year's Revolution

via prowrestling.wikia.com

The 2005 PPV, New Year's Revolution holds the distinction of being the only PPV up to date that the WWE has held in Puerto Rico. The show ended up being a sell out and was even sold out a little over a month prior to the date of the event. Yet, for some unexplainable reason the E didn't continue the PPV and they haven't returned to Puerto Rico to put on a PPV show either despite the success of New Year's Revolution. There's little, if anything that sticks out from the show with the exception of the Elimination Chamber match. The Elimination Chamber match involved Triple H defending his World Heavyweight Championship against six main eventers. The names included Batista, Chris Benoit, Edge, Ric Flair, Chris Jericho and Randy Orton. Triple H ended up retaining his title in what is arguably the most stacked Elimination Chamber match of all time.

1 The Wrestling Classic

via bleacherreport.com

The second PPV to ever be put on by the WWE, the Wrestling Classic took place on November 7th, 1985 in Rosemont, Illinois (well before CM Punk walked out on the WWE at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Illinois at Money in the Bank 2011). While the PPV may have been the second official WWE PPV (with the first being WrestleMania in the same year), the PPV was not brought back the following year and still hasn't been up to date. The event centralized around a 16 man tournament where the last two remaining individuals would face off for the WWE Championship. In the finals, Hulk Hogan met Roddy Piper where the balding blonde came out victorious over the kayfabe Scotsman in a short seven minute match.

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15 WWE PPVs You Probably Forgot About