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Finding A Gimmick: How These 20 Wrestling Stars Got Their Ring Names

Even from the earliest carnival roots of sports entertainment, the practice of a wrestler taking on an alias has intertwined among the very origins of professional wrestling. Whether to inspire intrigue, fear, or support, the practice of ring names for athletes in the "squared circle" has been as much a part of wrestling’s lore as championship histories.

During times of conflict, a capable wrestler in need of a boost to their box office appeal might find themselves assigned a character – often a cultural stereotype that was propagated through the black and white world of heroes and villains in wrestling. Often, these accentuated the worst of our beliefs about those “foreign” threats. Goose-stepping German Nazis, elitist English Lords, bearded Russian Communists, and of course the conniving villains from the far east.

But beyond the characters, some of the most interesting tales in the business are about how some of the best known wrestlers in the world came to be known by the ring persona whose name will be etched on the walls of professional wrestling history. How well do you know the origins of the ring names of these top stars? Let’s take a look at how some of the wrestlers whose aliases were featured atop the wrestling marquee, and the inspiration that was responsible for their lasting image.

20 Rob Van Dam

via whatculture.com

During his earliest years in the business, the man we now know as Mr. Monday Night was spotlighted in a special feature in Pro Wrestling Illustrated magazine identifying the stars to keep an eye on. While the feature admittedly missed the mark on such forgettable wrestlers as “Heavy Metal” Van Hammer, there was one youngster who would go on to great success. Listed as Rob Szatkowski, his legal name on his birth certificate, the man would also make some of his early TV appearances on WCW Television as Robbie V. RVD would get the ring name he is best known for because of recurring comparisons to an emerging actor with whom he resembled – “The Muscles from Brussels” Jean-Claude Van Damme.

19 Magnum T.A.

via 411mania.com

18 Curtis Axel

via forums.wrestlezone.com

Over the past decade, the WWE has struggled with how best to acknowledge the rich family bloodlines of its second and third generation talent, while also giving the current generation an opportunity to create success on their own laurels. They first dabbled with this in 1996 when the grandson of Peter Maivia, and son of Rocky Johnson made his WWE debut; to pay tribute, they called the young man Rocky Maivia. Thankfully, he would later ascend and cultivate his own identity, The Rock, in addition to moving on to become the highest paid movie star in 2016.

17 Dean Douglas

via pwpnation.com

Yes, WWE, we understand the importance of a distinct character to help casual fans to identify one wrestler from another, but was this really necessary? Troy Martin was a student of WWE legend Dominic DeNucci and had made many appearances for the company as an enhancement talent in his early days, rising to fame in WCW and ECW as Shane Douglas. Douglas had even enjoyed time in the WWE under that same name in the early 1990s, filling in for an injured Shawn Michaels to partner with Marty Jannetty on a number of occasions.

16 Jean Pierre-LaFitte

via armpit-wrestling.com

15 Goldust

via bleacherreport.com

While Dustin Runnels is perhaps best known for his work between the gold and black face paint and in a zippered bodysuit, the character originally began from a very dark place in Dustin’s life. Freshly fired from WCW in 1995 after the ill-fated King of the Road match on the first Uncensored pay per view, Dustin was also experiencing a period of estrangement from his famous father Dusty Rhodes. Arriving on the WWE’s doorstep, Dustin was looking to do something different than he had done in his seven year career to date, stepping away from the Rhodes name, and taking an opportunity to fire back in his own way at his father.

14 Madusa Miceli

via twitter.com

Minnesota’s Debbie Miceli first captured the attention of wrestling audiences in the AWA, where she reigned as Women’s Champion and riled audiences as a valet to some of the circuits most heinous villains. She would go on to success as Alundra Blayze in the WWE, and simply as Madusa in WCW. Her WCW run included some action not only against the ladies, but a few men as well – including a feud with Paul Heyman.

13 Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart

via chinlock.com

Aside from an absurd 1996 stint under a mask with the name “Who”, Jim Neidhart was one of the rare wrestlers in the modern age who wrestled the largest part of his career under his own given name. So for Neidhart, it’s not his name, but his nickname that we are curious about.

12 Virgil

via tumblr.com

There are occasions when the wrestling industry draws its inspiration from the business itself. Such was the case with Mike Jones, who was called up to the WWE after spending time in the Memphis territory wrestling by the name Soul Train Jones. Jones was to portray the role of a man-servant and valet for “The Million Dollar Man” Ted DiBiase, and was given the name Virgil.

11 Ricky Steamboat

via wrestlingclassics.com

One of the most celebrated ring technicians of the 1980s has to be Ricky “The Dragon” Steamboat. His unparalleled matches against the likes of Randy Savage and Ric Flair have cemented his name into the annals of wrestling history. In truth, the New York-born wrestler who was billed from Honolulu, Hawaii for much of his career was born with a name that screams “pro wrestler” – Richard Blood. However, he would only use his birth name during the first few months of his career while wrestling for Verne Gagne’s AWA.

10 Kamala

via memphisrap.com

When Jim Harris first debuted in professional wrestling, the massive African-American grappler was billed as Sugar Bear Harris. He competed in the southeast, and then had the opportunity to compete in England during the early 80s. Upon his return to the United States, he was recruited by Jerry Lawler for the Memphis territory, feeling he would be a good fit for an idea that they had in mind.

9 “Stone Cold” Steve Austin

via foxsports.com

Sometimes, even an experienced team of writers gets stymied to create the iconic character for an incoming wrestler and future WWE Hall of Famer. Born Steve Williams in Texas, a young Steve Austin fell in love with professional wrestling and decided to give the business a try. However, wrestling already had a top star competing by the name Steve “Dr. Death” Williams, so he was dubbed Steve Austin by Dutch Mantell (aka Zeb Colter) to prevent confusion.

8 Mankind

via thesportsmatrix.com

The story of Mankind’s origin in the WWE is one that has been told repeatedly by the man behind the character himself. Mick Foley had been wrestling for more than a decade around the world as Cactus Jack, and was met with closed doors every time he tried to make in-roads to the WWE. However, his unorthodox ring style and seemingly self-damaging repertoire of moves, like a running elbow drop from the ring apron to the concrete floor created a reputation for him as a destructive force.

7 Honky Tonk Man

via chinlock.com

For those that have followed the career of the Honky Tonk Man since he was first signed with the WWE in 1986, it may be hard to envision that just a few years prior, he sported long flowing blonde locks and a regal goatee with a waxed mustache. Abandoning that character to create a new image for himself, Wayne Farris grew a pencil-thin mustache and greased back his hair – a look inspired by Pat Harrington Jr’s character “Schneider” on the TV sitcom One Day at a Time.

6 Billy Graham

via phoenixnewtimes.com

In his youth, Eldridge Wayne Coleman had no aspirations to get into the world of professional wrestling. The Arizona bodybuilder was looking to find his fame and fortune when he ventured to Calgary, Alberta, Canada hoping to making it in professional football. A career on the gridiron didn’t pan out for the future star, but he was introduced to Stu Hart who gave him his first break in wrestling, competing as Wayne Coleman and partnered with former pro footballer Angelo Mosca.

5 Roddy Piper

via youtube.com

Born Roderick George Toombs in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, it may have seemed entirely unlikely that the 19-year-old kid who debuted at a strapping 180 pounds would go on to become one of the most iconic wrestlers in the industry. Certainly, his trainer Tony Condello could not have predicted it when Piper was taking his first steps down the road to wrestling stardom.

4 The Junkyard Dog

via midsouthfan.com

Can you think of another wrestler that went on to great acclaim in any era of the business with a less flattering name than the Junk Yard Dog? When Sylvester Ritter first debuted in the ring, he competed as Big Daddy Ritter, wrestling in Tennessee, Alberta, Germany, and Japan. When he returned home to the southern States, he was signed to Mid-South Wrestling by wrestler-turned-promoter Bill Watts. Watts learned that in addition to wrestling, Ritter had a sideline career working in an auto wrecking yard and gave him the name Junkyard Dog.

3 Dusty Rhodes

via infinitehollywood.com

The 2015 death of “The American Dream” Dusty Rhodes was a loss that was felt across the entire industry. His portrayal of a common man - the son of a plumber - so stirred audiences that he is recognized as one of the biggest wrestling personalities of all-time. But how did Virgil Riley Runnels become Dusty Rhodes?

2 Randy Savage

via forums.2k.com

Born into a wrestling family, the son of successful journeyman wrestler, Angelo Poffo and the younger brother of the sturdy Lanny Poffo, there wouldn’t seem to be any reason for Randy to even consider a name other than the one shared by his blood relations. In fact, for the first two years of his career, he appeared under his own name, frequently teaming with his brother Lanny in a number of territories. However, when he arrived in Georgia in 1977, Ole Anderson looked at him with his wild hair and piercing, intense gaze and correctly assessed that he resembled a savage. So, on February 28, 1977 in Augusta Georgia, Poffo would make his first appearance as Randy Savage.

1 Hulk Hogan

via deanoinamerica.wordpress.com

Conceivably one of the biggest names in the wrestling industry of all time, Hulk Hogan achieved wide spread popularity on television, in movies and across all entertainment platforms in the 1980s; but it’s a safe bet that he wouldn’t have done it had he still been recognized by one of his earlier ring names. Aside from a rookie year assignment as the Super Destroyer in Florida, Hulk’s first ring name in the southeast was Sterling Golden. That changed when he arrived in Memphis as Terry Boulder. However, when he found himself on the radar of Vince McMahon Sr. and was called up to the WWE, McMahon had a different idea yet.

McMahon was a strong believer that his audiences were comprised of every ethnicity that resided in his territory in the American northeast. He aspired to create stars that spoke to each of those cultural groups, so that every segment of the community felt that they had their own champion to rally behind. Hulk was assigned the surname Hogan and intended to be the idol of the Irish community.

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Finding A Gimmick: How These 20 Wrestling Stars Got Their Ring Names