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Golden Era Vs. New Era: 20 Dream Matches Between 80s Stars And Today's Stars

Wrestling fans are among the most loyal in all of sport. However, the interesting dynamic among fans is that most are loyal to a specific era, and they stand by it as the best. Frequently, fans point to the wrestling that first attracted them to the business as the era that was the best. However, there is little dispute that professional wrestling saw its biggest surge of growth in the 1980s with the jump to cable television, which took the product from regional coverage to national visibility. The stars of the 1980s remain among the most revered stars of all time, and their exploits are regularly re-visited in clips on the WWE Network and through YouTube footage as well.

But how do the stars of the 1980s stack up against the current headliners on television today? What are some of the exciting showdowns that we wish we could see today to settle the dispute? From an era when the wrestlers were on the road for 300 days a year, to today when the saturation of the wrestling product sees the wrestlers on TV every single day, how would these dream matches play out? Take a look at this line up and you decide.

20 The Bushwhackers vs. The Dudley Boyz

via wrestlingrumors.net

WWE fans may point to the unorthodox team of Butch Miller and Luke Williams during their run in the Vince McMahon empire, and dismiss The Bushwhackers as an undercard comedy duo. However, before the New Zealand-born cousins arrived in the WWE, they were among one of the most internationally celebrated and feared teams as The Sheepherders. In bloody feuds with the likes of The Fabulous Ones and The Fantastics, they carved a wide swath. In fact, their legacy reminds us a little of a team that cut their teeth as a duo in a Philadelphia bingo hall for Extreme Championship Wrestling; The Dudley Boyz.

19 Dusty Rhodes vs. Goldust

via sportskeeda.com

As fans, we have been blessed to witness a number of family legacies in the sport – watching sons rise from the shadows of their father, and carve out their own place in wrestling history. Dustin Rhodes began his career alongside his father during the close of the 1980s, but in 1996 a brief estrangement from his World Champion father led to the creation of the character that would define his career.

18 Demolition vs. Ascension

via youtube.com

There is an astonishing similarity between the introduction and the debut of Demolition, and the television debut of The Ascension. When Demolition first appeared on the scene in 1987, they were quickly dismissed as the WWE’s (wrong) answer to the Legion of Doom. However, they rose to become one of the most iconic and memorable teams of the 1980s, generating a loyal following and championship success. Similarly, the Ascension alienated the WWE Universe with their introductory promo on television, declaring themselves to be dominant in the same scale as the best teams of the 1980s.

17 Iron Sheik vs. Rusev

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As long as there has been professional wrestling, the business has leveraged the political sensitivities. Wrestling promotions would utilize foreign "evils" of the day, to create threats who would be a natural foil for the most patriotic rivals. In 1983, the American hostilities with Iran made Khosrow Vaziri one of the most visible and reviled villains of the 1980s. The former Olympic wrestler-turned pro was a dangerous customer whose infamy was great enough to launch the era of Hulkamania.

16 Samoan Swat Team vs. The Usos

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In 1989, Pro Wrestling Illustrated suggested that it was hard to tell Samoan tag teams apart without a score card. The 1980s featured a number of dominant pairings from the south Pacific – The Wild Samoans (Sika & Afa), The Islanders (Haku & Tama), and The Samoan Swat Team (Samu & Fatu). After running rough shod over the competition in World Class Championship Wrestling, the Samoan Swat Team raided WCW, where their physicality was only matched by the Steiner brothers. In the WWE as the Headshrinkers, they achieved championship success.

15 Wendi Richter vs. Becky Lynch

via wrestling-jat.wikia.com

14 The Freebirds vs. New Day

via wwe.com

The Fabulous Freebirds weren’t the first trio to change the scope of tag team wrestling, but they certainly took the earlier template set by The Grahams and The Valiant Brothers to a whole new level in their travels during wrestling’s territory era. Best known for their wars against the Von Erichs in Texas, some might argue that the Fabulous Freebirds were simply ahead of their time; their efforts to record their own music videos and release albums would have fit right into the culture of the WWE a decade later.

13 Steve Williams vs. Brock Lesnar

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12 Ricky Steamboat vs. Randy Orton

via youtube.com

There are a lot of similarities in the ring style and movements of both Randy Orton and Ricky Steamboat, that make a potential match between The Viper and The Dragon very compelling. Both wrestlers are lithe and agile, versatile enough to compete with the cruiserweights, all while seeing success in the heavyweight division. Both are also very animated, even when they find themselves at the mercy of their opponents; which has contributed to define their delivery as performers.

11 Bruiser Brody vs. Kane

via pinterest.com

10 Nick Bockwinkel vs. Chris Jericho

via twitter.com

As much as fans marvel at the performance of the wrestlers from bell to bell, it is often the work on the microphone that has raised our ire, and urged us to buy tickets to see the grapplers we love to hate get their comeuppance. Such is the case with both of the competitors in this dream showdown.

Nick Bockwinkel carried himself with gentlemanly sophistication, waxing eloquently in pre-match interviews in a condescending fashion that alienated him from the majority of the ticket buying public. Despite that, fans turned out in droves to see the good guys try to make Bockwinkel eat his own four syllable words.

9 Jake Roberts vs. Bray Wyatt

via youtube.com

Over the past three generations, there have been a number of wrestlers that have left us with an uneasy feeling in the pit of our stomach. A feeling that leaves us apprehensive about the unseen horrors that may await us around the next corner. In the 1980s, it wasn’t only Jake “The Snake" Roberts’ python Damian that made our skin crawl, but also his piercing gaze and ominous tone that sent chills down our spine. Conversely, few have been able to rattle fans to the same degree as the leader of the Wyatt family has with his lantern and rocking chair.

8 British Bulldogs vs. Killer Elite Squad

via lakako.com

In 1996, a decade after their sole reign as WWE World Tag Team Champions, The British Bulldogs were recognized by RAW Magazine as the greatest WWE Tag Team Champions of all time. That’s quite a feat when you consider the number of teams that have passed through the doors of the WWE over the years. Davey Boy Smith and Dynamite Kid were innovators that combined their English training, Stu Hart’s dungeon, and Japanese experience to bring a dynamic tag team style to the WWE, that mainstays in the company had a hard time adjusting to.

7 Sherri Martel vs. Charlotte

via wwe.com

While Sherri Martel is often remembered as a manager, it is important to consider her achievements as an active competitor before she assumed a role of a valet; supporting the careers of Randy Savage, Ted DiBiase, Shawn Michaels and Harlem Heat. Martel reigned as AWA Women’s Champion and was the woman to finally unseat Fabulous Moolah in 1987 as WWE Women’s Champion. Sherri brought a physicality to her matches that made many uncomfortable, and Shawn Michaels has stated “she was tougher than some of the guys”.

6 Road Warriors vs. War Machine

via uproxx.com/twitter.com

The intimidation factor and pure dominance of the Road Warriors, aka the Legion of Doom, has been almost without rival in the entire history of tag team wrestling. At their peak, they inspired a lot of jealousy among their peers, especially at the money they were able to command for appearances. Despite being considered less skilled than some of their foes, The Road Warriors captured the attention of the fans and inspired many copycats in the years that would follow. Claiming to “snack on danger, and dine on death” Animal and Hawk remain in a class by themselves.

5 Randy Savage vs. Kenny Omega

via comicvine.gamespot.com/Twitter.com

After listening to opponents of Randy Savage during the 1980s, you will learn that he was a perfectionist but perhaps more importantly that Savage was decidedly “new school” in his approach to matches. Ricky Steamboat has reported that Savage memorized every sequence of their heralded WrestleMania III match ... which was contrary to the convention of the day. Should Randy Savage be re-introduced to wrestling today, he would fit in without missing a step. The Macho Man was also a renegade in the business – stemming from his days working for his father’s outlaw promotion, and publicly challenging wrestlers from rival organizations to show up and face him. We’ve seen the same recently out of Kenny Omega. Omega, who has emerged as the leading gaijin in New Japan Pro Wrestling.

4 Mr. Perfect vs. Dolph Ziggler

via rantsports.com

It’s not just the slick curly locks that have us drawing comparisons between Curt Hennig and The Showoff. Both wrestlers enjoyed lengthy stays at the height of visibility, securing the Intercontinental Championship and frequently headlining matches. Yet, neither of them were able to parlay their talent into a memorable run as World Champion. Both wrestlers come from credible amateur sport backgrounds and have risen to the top through their own performances between the ropes, unselfishly showcasing the best in their opponents, even to their own physical detriment.

3 Roddy Piper vs. Dean Ambrose

via eireplusalba.wordpress.com

WWE officials wanted Piper to concede to Mr. T when they met in a boxing match at WrestleMania II, and they were met with resounding and absolute defiance of that order. Roddy Piper was old school, fearing that any loss on television or pay-per-view decreased his value and created the possibility that he could be shown the door. There are very few occasions that anyone will find wherein Piper’s shoulders were ever pinned to the mat, taking most of his losses by DQ. For Piper, it wasn’t a matter of needing to have his hand raised, but instead a matter of survival in a business that wasn’t always kind to the stars that put their well-beings on the line.

2 Andre the Giant vs. Big Show

via sltdwrestling.com

Upon his retirement from the business, Ric Flair declared that Big Show was the “best big man in the history of the business,” in a subtle way suggesting that Paul Wight had eclipsed Andre the Giant’s status as the top giant in the sport. However, Andre was a worldwide phenomenon in his day, a marquee attraction that packed the house wherever he appeared around the world – often appearing in handicap matches against two or three foes, then again in a battle royal, to illustrate his sheer enormity over all others who laced their boots. A showdown with Andre the Giant might help to erase the matches that Big Show has endured with Floyd Mayweather and Akebono, but nothing would be decided in terms of who was wrestling’s most dominant giant.

1 Hulk Hogan vs. John Cena

via 51vs.com

There may a debate for years to come about who the single greatest star in the history of the WWE has been. Hulk Hogan carried the brand through national expansion and for nearly a decade that followed. Hogan transcended wrestling to become a pop culture icon that was recognized by people who weren’t even wrestling fans. Presently, though, one of the most polarizing stars on the WWE roster, John Cena, has seen the same success – movie roles, personal appearances, merchandising, etc. Cena has become the Hogan of the modern era. But pitted against one another – Hulk Hogan at the height of Hulkamania against the Cenation – theirs would be a match that is sure to capture the imagination of both fans and the industry. Both are charismatic, both have excelled using a fairly modest repertoire of moves, both have had the ear of Vince McMahon. Who wins? That’s one debate that won’t be settled on this list.

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Golden Era Vs. New Era: 20 Dream Matches Between 80s Stars And Today's Stars