We all have our own opinions about what WWE is doing right and what they are doing wrong. Most times we can agree, or even agree to disagree, but sometimes we just have our own opinions that are unpopular.

About five years ago there was a growing number of people that said we need to start to show John Cena respect as a performer. Fans responded to the claim by making fun of the person who suggested it, and disregarding their statement. Five years later, and now the general consensus of fans give Cena credit for doing his best to work with the talent available.

Obviously since I just dropped the Cena example above, it won’t be an entry on this list. Another thing that won’t be on this list is the debate on whether or not Chris Benoit should be in the WWE Hall of Fame. That topic is a can of worms that has no definitive answer, and therefore would distract from the other entries on this list.

Another thing that won’t be on this list is whether the Attitude Era was overrated, a topic which has dominated wrestling forums for years. The truth of the matter is that like most things, wrestling is a matter of taste. Maybe you enjoyed the raunchy nature of the WWE in the late 90s, or maybe you despised it. No matter how you feel about it either way, there will be emails about how ECW was better than anything during the Attitude Era…it wasn’t.


So read the list that is below, and be sure to let us know what you think in the comments. You may think that the list is wrong on every entry, but that is the great part about having an opinion. Below are the top 10 unpopular opinions about the WWE.

10. Steve Austin Matches Weren’t Great After 1997

via cheapheat.com

via cheapheat.com

Steve Austin was always one of the best technicians in the business, up until his unfortunate piledriver accident at the hands of Owen Hart at 1997’s SummerSlam. After his recovery from a broken neck Austin was never the same, adapting more of a brawler style. Obviously Austin still had great matches after his injury, but his style changed so much that without the stomps, punches, middle fingers, and stunners he would be average at best.

9. Matt Bloom (Tensai/Albert) Has the Best Powerbomb Ever

via thejohncenablog.blogspot.com

via thejohncenablog.blogspot.com

This one is a personal opinion that I have about Matt Bloom/A-Train/Tensai, which is that he has the prettiest powerbomb in the business. His Sit Out Powerbomb finisher, sounds and looks like it destroys his opponent, but when looking at it slowly it’s evident that he is in amazing control of his body. Although his new gimmick flopped as Tensai when he returned to WWE in 2012, his use of the Choke Out Powerbomb was equally as graceful.

8. Edge is Overrated

via cheapseatchronicles.com

via cheapseatchronicles.com

What has Edge done besides be at the right place at the right time? Fans loved Edge as an Intercontinental Champion, but as the World Champion, he just didn’t have it. Don’t get me wrong, he has a great legacy of matches to his name as a tag team wrestler, and even an epic feud with Matt Hardy that blurred the lines of reality. The guy is extremely talented, but name one time that you said to yourself, “WWE couldn’t stand losing him.” Edge is a product of big names retiring, and being at the right place at the right time to reap the benefits.

7. WWE’s nWo Could Have Been Awesome

via tumblr.com

via tumblr.com

When the nWo came to the WWE in 2002, fans were intrigued to see how Scott Hall, Kevin Nash, and Hulk Hogan would fit into the current system. The three original members of the nWo played a major role in the storylines that year, culminating with the historic Hogan versus Rock match at WrestleMania X-8. After WrestleMania, Hogan left the group, and like the WCW incarnation it became bloated with additional members. Eventually Vince McMahon would disband the group shortly after the induction of Shawn Michaels as a member.
Let’s play what if; what if the WWE’s nWo would have been what it always was supposed to be? In the 1990s the nWo and DX were both offshoots of the Kliq, which “divided and conquered” both companies according to Kevin Nash during the Steve Austin Podcast. In 2002 all five members of the Kliq (even Justin Credible if you want to stretch it to six) were in the WWE. The long time friends would finally have donned the same colors and been an on screen faction, who could have storywise feuded with the rest of the roster. It would have been one of the greatest storylines of the 2000s.

6. Sin Cara (Mistico) is Talented, and Entertaining

via fanpop.com

via fanpop.com

You know that the fans think you are a botch-a-maniac when someone makes a theme song about all of your missteps. When Sin Cara debuted in 2011 the WWE billed him as the next Rey Mysterio, unfortunately he was plagued by injuries and did not live up to the hype. Sin Cara gets a bad rap for messing up in matches, but I think that his botches are justifiable in a sense. He was working with many guys who have never wrestled in the Mexican style, and the moves that he did were all high risk. Despite his documented botches, the original Sin Cara is talented, and entertaining.

5. Michael Cole is Irreplaceable 

via prowrestlingpowerhouse.com

via prowrestlingpowerhouse.com

Despite all of his corny catchphrases, and his less than memorable commentaries, Michael Cole is irreplaceable. Many fans compare him with Jim Ross, who is worshiped by most, and that comparison is unjust. Cole, who came to wrestling from a news background, plays to his strengths, which are keeping the show moving while doling out tons of information. In addition to that, Cole has been a presence on commentary since 1999 and especially showed his composure and ability while handling Jerry Lawler’s on-air heart attack in 2014.

4. Bret Hart was Actually a Decent Promo

Is Bret Hart the best the best there is, the best there was, and the best there ever will be? That is up to you and his place in history is debatable, what is not debatable is his ability on the mic. For years I have heard people disregard Hart’s ability to cut a promo, citing that he is too boring to be good. Bret Hart’s promos as the heel leader of the Hart Foundation are gold, showing that Bret was at his best when he was pissed. Check out his promo on the October 6th edition of Raw in 1997 to see him lay into HBK and Triple H. Other great examples were when he snapped following a steel cage loss to Sid, forming the Hart Foundation, heck even his ‘El Dandy’ promo in WCW was hilarious.

3. Paul Heyman is Boring Sometimes

via wwe.com

via wwe.com

Don’t get me wrong, Paul Heyman is very entertaining, and is capable of keeping crowds hanging on his every word. Conversely, the one behind the one in 21-1, can make a five-minute segment seem like forever. Heyman beats around the bush so much sometimes, that it makes his point seem less important. His most effective promos were done with such a fire and intensity, that you couldn’t help but get behind him. Recently with his more slow, intent, and Jerichoish style, the only time the audience can get a rise, is when he mentions his client; BROOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCK LESNAR.

2. Evolution was better than the Horsemen

via wwe.com

via wwe.com

This one is going to get me killed, but without a doubt Evolution is a greater stable than the Four Horsemen. To look at this objectively, first exclude Ric Flair from both stables, as he cancels himself out.

Everyone says that the Horsemen are the prototype for stables (no pun intended), but when you take the nostalgia factor away from the name, the original Horseman were a bunch of mid-card wrestlers led by Flair. Even the addition of new Horsemen didn’t add to the star power of the group, with a rotating roster that included:

  1. Ric Flair (cancels himself out)
  2. Arn Anderson
  3. Tully Blanchard
  4. Barry Windham
  5. Ole Anderson
  6. Brian Pillman
  7. Chris Benoit
  8. Curt Hennig
  9. Dean Malenko
  10. Jeff Jarrett
  11. Sting
  12. Lex Luger
  13. Sid Vicious
  14. Steve “Mongo” McMichael
  15. Paul Roma

When combined the names mentioned may carry more allure than that of Batista, Triple H, and Randy Orton, but keep in mind that the ratio is 14 wrestlers compared to three.

Evolution had all of the major titles, ran storylines, and had better theme music too.

1. Triple H is the Only Thing That Can Save WWE

via youtube.com

via youtube.com

Why does the IWC (Internet Wrestling Community) hate Triple H so much? Triple H came into the picture before the Attitude Era and has been a constant presence in the WWE. He has been one of Vince McMahon’s most loyal soldiers, and therefore has been rewarded with added responsibility. If you’re mad that he is in a position of power just think about the fact that without him, there is no Randy Orton and Batista (in their prime), no additions to legends like Bruno and Warrior in the HOF, and there is no NXT. He acutally has full control over NXT, and they have the best product on WWE television so get over your obsession with him burying people, he is keeping the business from being buried.

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