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Top 15 Underrated Women of the Attitude Era

As most wrestling fans can tell you, the ladies of the business weren’t always known as “Divas.” The moniker was bestowed upon the company’s female talent upon the introduction of the Diva Search, the talent scouting contest that’s soon to return to WWE as a part of its scheduled network programming. Before there were WWE Divas, there were valets, women’s wrestlers, and most importantly, women’s champions. The Attitude Era was arguably the changing point in women’s wrestling, as sexuality was the unabashed main focus of the era’s top female names and would remain that way until trailblazers like Molly Holly and Victoria ushered the WWE’s women’s division out of the Attitude Era.

In fact, it could be said that post-Attitude Era gimmicks such as Molly Holly’s chastity as opposed to Trish Stratus’s amped-up sexuality or former Women’s Champion Ivory’s character as a frustrated defender of propriety in Right to Censor were the catalysts for change at the turn of the 21st century. There was a time during the Attitude Era where the convergence of sex, blood, and rock and roll became too much for advertisers and Vince McMahon, on the verge of seeing his company go public on the New York Stock Exchange, knew a change had to be made. Over a period of years there were less bra-and-panties gimmick matches, less hyper-sexualized onscreen activity on WWE programming, and outfits became much less revealing. By 2007, nearly all vestiges of over-the-top impropriety were wiped away from the company’s now very PG slate, the last display of outrageousness being the advertised “live sex celebration” on a 2006 RAW featuring Edge and Lita. By Attitude Era standards, even that moment was tamed down considerably. Although the WWE’s female performers now go by a different branding and a different standard, it would be bad form to forget the contributions of women such as Sunny, Sable, and Chyna who arrived on the scene before today’s Total Divas. There are likely some names you may have forgotten from that unforgettable era in wrestling.

15 15. Cynthia “Bobcat” Lynch

14 14. Barbara “BB” Bush

via wrestlingforum.com

13 13. Mrs. Yamaguchi-San

via prowrestling.wikia.com

12 12. Nicole Bass

via prowrestling.wikia.com

11 11. Marianna Komlos

via obsessedwithwrestling.com

10 10. Beulah McGillicutty

via shitloadsofwrestling.tumblr.com

9 9. Ryan Shamrock

via prowrestling.wikia.com

8 8. Sara Calaway

via fanpix.famousfix.com

7 7. Debra Marshall

via pixgood.com

6 6. Stacy Carter

via prowrestling.wikia.com

5 5. Tori

via needtoconsume.com

4 4. Jacqueline

via pixshark.com

3 3. Terri Runnels

via fanpop.com

2 2. Lisa “Ivory” Moretti

via sporcle.com

1 1. Luna Vachon

via thewrestlingmania.com

It’s possible that the late, great Luna was one of very few women who can seamlessly fit in any generation of wrestling. As she debuted with the WWE at WrestleMania IX with Shawn Michaels at the end of the company’s “New Generation” era, very few could have guessed that Luna’s wild-child ways would become the standard during the Attitude Era. You’d think the company would have utilized Luna’s now legendary savage style a little better during such an “anything goes” period, but what she did give the fans was memorable. The Attitude Era was at its freakiest when Goldust eventually moved on from Marlena to Luna as his valet and the two became delightfully, sexually weird. Then came Luna’s turn as Princess of the group The Oddities, the Insane Clown Posse crossover team that solidified the fact that Vince McMahon was going all in when it came to craziness during that era in wrestling.

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Top 15 Underrated Women of the Attitude Era