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Top 15 Wrestlers Who Should Have Never Stepped Foot In A Ring

By its nature, professional wrestling is a spectacle, with a cast of characters in its ranks that are different from any other form of sport or entertainment. As a result of this, some people who try their hand at the in-ring aspect of the business, often aren't a great example of technical skill. Some through the years have just been downright awful, and painful to watch.

We've it all over the years, in many different promotions; wrestlers who just don't belong inside the squared circle. It could be the matter of poor training, a bad gimmick, awkward look, but it almost always falls in conjunction with the lack of ability. Putting on a quality match is not as simple as it may sound, and there have been many of wrestlers who simply are not able to do it. Sure, not everyone can be the second coming of Ric Flair, but there is a standard that should have to be met for match quality.

This is a list that compiles these flops in the ring, all of whom would have been better off keeping their day job. As a rule, only real "wrestlers" qualified for this, meaning that Dennis Rodman and Lawrence Taylor's one-off matches don't fit the bill. Everyone on here spent relatively consistent time with at least one promotion. Overall, they all never served much of a purpose in the business, and can be chalked up as failed experiments. These wrestlers may have been cringeworthy to watch at the time, but hopefully they serve as a benchmark for failure in the squared circle, and promotions learn from these horrific mistakes.

Ranked below are the top 15 wrestlers who never should have stepped foot in a ring.

15 Bastion Booger

via wwe.fr

One of the most notably cringeworthy characters in early 1990s WWE, the Bastion Booger character was played by Mike Shaw, who was not one of the better wrestlers of his era. Wearing the most hideous and dirty gray singlet you'll ever see, he was basically a gross glutton who lost his first match against Virgil. Yes, that Virgil. He was quite obviously a jobber with a single PPV appearance at the 1993 Survivor Series as part of a team with Bam Bam Bigelow and The Headshrinkers.

14 Kurrgan

via wwe.com

13 Insane Clown Posse

via wwe.com

The cult of ICP is something I've never understood, and never really desired to take the predictably short amount of time it would require to understand it. So naturally I'm not a fan of their in-ring work, which incredibly has spanned major promotions - WWE, WCW and ECW included.

They started off in ECW, showing up during the company's second ever PPV, Hardcore Heaven, in 1997. They would then appear in the WWE as part of The Oddities, where they would sing the group's theme song. They even had a longer-than-necessary stint in WCW, forming two stables during their time there: The Dead Pool and The Dark Carnival.

12 Vince McMahon

via officialfan.proboards.com

Some may not agree with this, but I never thought it was a good idea to let McMahon actually wrestle matches against main event talent. Yes, it was unique, and his feud with "Stone Cold" Steve Austin was entertaining, no questions there, but it always seemed hokey and contrived when he would put himself on the card. Sure, stars like Austin and Shawn Michaels could carry him to a watchable match, but poor oldĀ Bret Hart should not have been in a ring, let alone against someone like Vince.

11 Heidenreich

via alchetron.com

Another ex-football player who deemed it a good idea to make a living as a professional wrestler, Heidenreich was possibly the most generic WWE character in the first half of the 2000s. He was boring, bad in the ring, with the same shtick everyone's seen countless times before from the WWE creative team. It almost seemed like a parody of what a professional wrestler should be, in the most banal, uninformed way possible. His theme song was absolutely horrible, and the less said about his incident with Michael Cole, the better - we still shudder thinking about that one.

10 Kevin Sullivan

via wwe.com

9 Kamala

via kamalaspeaks.com

8 Steve McMichael

via fwc.wikia.com

7 David Flair

via wwe.com

6 Luther Biggs

via youtube.com

5 Yokozuna

via wwe.com

4 John Zandig

via neogaf.com

3 "Hacksaw" Jim Duggan

via wwe.com

2 Giant Gonzalez

via wwe.com

1 David Arquette

via audioboom.com

It is commonly considered among the wrestling populace, that the day WCW officially died was when well-known, established actor, David Arquette won the promotion's Heavyweight Title in 2000, thereby invalidating any credibility it still held. In fairness, Arquette objected to the idea, but Vince Russo insisted that it was for the good of the company. Arquette was actually on the roster for months during the year 2000, and it has to go down as one of the biggest punchlines in wrestling history. He had just appeared in the movie, Ready To Rumble at the time, which is why the angle was ever thought up in the first place. To this day, Arquette's time in WCW is seen as one of the biggest stains on the legacy of the business.

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Top 15 Wrestlers Who Should Have Never Stepped Foot In A Ring